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Give conveyancers up-front property information earlier, Sprift urges agents

first_imgHome » News » Give conveyancers up-front property information earlier, Sprift urges agents previous nextProducts & ServicesGive conveyancers up-front property information earlier, Sprift urges agentsProperty report firm says its new dashboard enables estate agents to instantly share key data with third parties, speeding up sales.Nigel Lewis15th April 20210335 Views Property reports platform Sprift has joined the effort to reform the sales progression process with a new tool that enables agents to instantly share information with third parties.The industry, tech firms, Land Registry and the ministry of housing are all trying to solve the conundrum of how to speed up the pre-exchange data gathering exercise.This can take solicitors weeks to complete often leaving agents, buyers and vendors in the dark about progress, a frustration amplified by the current stamp duty-driven sales boom.The Sprift dashboard provides some 100 data points for all of the UK’s 28 million homes. This includes title plans, planning history, EPCs, photos, floorplans, conservation areas and flood risks, as well as the necessary legal and protocol forms.Local Authority searches“Sprift doesn’t replace the need for Local Authority searches – instead, it provides details of the planning history for the target property and nearby properties, all geo coded,” says CEO Matt Gilpin (main pic).“The feedback from agents and conveyancers is that the Sprift data highlights things they need to know and delve into further, whilst potentially waiting for searches, saving them time in the long run.“Conveyancers also comment that having access to all of the property’s marketing information and correct streetview immediately gives them a better feel for the property.”Paul Rolfe, owner at Scottish agency Paul Rolfe Sales and Lettings, says: “Better communications and upfront information are the way forward when it comes to speeding up the property buying process.”Angelo Piccirillo, partner at AVRillo Conveyancing, adds: “We are determined to seek out game-changing technology to make the client experience a better one. Anything that supports a more transparent procedure has to be to the benefit of all parties.”photos conservation areas title plans planning history Matt Gilpin Sprift EPCS floorplans April 15, 2021Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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HHS announces final rules, delay in implementation of contraceptive mandate

first_imgThe Obama administration announced on Tuesday a one-year delay in implementing the final rules regarding the Affordable Care Act’s mandated contraceptive coverage. The White House released the final rules Friday, in response to concerns raised by non-profit religious organizations about the original healthcare proposal. The mandate will take effect in 2015. The final rule states that an organization that objects to providing contraceptives on religious grounds can offer employees a plan that does not provide contraceptive coverage. The health insurer administering the plan then enrolls employees in a separate, individual, private policy that only covers contraceptives at no extra cost. Notre Dame is self-insured. A self-insured organization that objects to providing contraceptives can notify its third-party healthcare administrator that it objects. The administrator then “notifies enrollees in the health plans that it is providing or arranging separate no-cost payments for contraceptive services for them for as long as they remain enrolled in the health plan,” according to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) website. University Spokesman Dennis Brown said, “We are studying the ruling and, once that’s complete, will evaluate our options.” HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said on the department’s website that the final rules guarantee women free access to preventive services recommended by the Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academies of Science. “[The] announcement reinforces our commitment to respect the concerns of houses of worship and other non-profit religious organizations that object to contraceptive coverage, while helping to ensure that women get the care they need, regardless of where they work,” Sebelius said. Law professor Rick Garnett, an expert on religious liberty cases, said litigation against the mandate likely will continue. He said some non-exempt religious organizations will argue that the final rules, like the original ones, impose a substantial and unnecessary burden on the free exercise of religion. “In response, it will be contended that it is these groups’ insurance carriers, and not the groups themselves, that are providing the objectionable coverage,” Garnett said. “It is likely that different courts will resolve the issue in different ways, which raises the possibility that eventually, the Supreme Court will be asked to weigh in.” In May 2012, Notre Dame filed one of more than 40 religious liberty lawsuits from faith-based organizations contesting the constitutionality of the contraception mandate. The lawsuit stated the mandate would go against Church teachings and therefore would violate the First Amendment, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and other federal laws. A federal judge dismissed Notre Dame’s lawsuit in early January, when U.S. District Court Judge Robert Miller Jr. ruled the University’s claim was not yet “ripe,” meaning it was not ready to be litigated. This was the case because the rule regarding contraceptive coverage had not been finalized.  The University declined to provide public comment on the iteration of the mandate that the Obama administration proposed in February.,The Obama administration announced on Tuesday a one-year delay in implementing the final rules regarding the Affordable Care Act’s mandated contraceptive coverage. The White House released the final rules Friday, in response to concerns raised by non-profit religious organizations about the original healthcare proposal. The mandate will take effect in 2015. The final rule states that an organization that objects to providing contraceptives on religious grounds can offer employees a plan that does not provide contraceptive coverage. The health insurer administering the plan then enrolls employees in a separate, individual, private policy that only covers contraceptives at no extra cost. Notre Dame is self-insured. A self-insured organization that objects to providing contraceptives can notify its third-party healthcare administrator that it objects. The administrator then “notifies enrollees in the health plans that it is providing or arranging separate no-cost payments for contraceptive services for them for as long as they remain enrolled in the health plan,” according to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) website. University Spokesman Dennis Brown said, “We are studying the ruling and, once that’s complete, will evaluate our options.” HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said on the department’s website that the final rules guarantee women free access to preventive services recommended by the Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academies of Science. “[The] announcement reinforces our commitment to respect the concerns of houses of worship and other non-profit religious organizations that object to contraceptive coverage, while helping to ensure that women get the care they need, regardless of where they work,” Sebelius said. Law professor Rick Garnett, an expert on religious liberty cases, said litigation against the mandate likely will continue. He said some non-exempt religious organizations will argue that the final rules, like the original ones, impose a substantial and unnecessary burden on the free exercise of religion. “In response, it will be contended that it is these groups’ insurance carriers, and not the groups themselves, that are providing the objectionable coverage,” Garnett said. “It is likely that different courts will resolve the issue in different ways, which raises the possibility that eventually, the Supreme Court will be asked to weigh in.” In May 2012, Notre Dame filed one of more than 40 religious liberty lawsuits from faith-based organizations contesting the constitutionality of the contraception mandate. The lawsuit stated the mandate would go against Church teachings and therefore would violate the First Amendment, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and other federal laws. A federal judge dismissed Notre Dame’s lawsuit in early January, when U.S. District Court Judge Robert Miller Jr. ruled the University’s claim was not yet “ripe,” meaning it was not ready to be litigated. This was the case because the rule regarding contraceptive coverage had not been finalized.  The University declined to provide public comment on the iteration of the mandate that the Obama administration proposed in February.last_img read more

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Einstein’s Long Island Summer of ’39

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Scientists at the Brookhaven National Laboratory call this coming Feb. 11 the “cool-down” day. That’s when they start chilling the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to the temperature of liquid helium (more than 450 degrees below zero) so they can begin colliding polarized protons in a series of physics experiments set to run through the spring that would have thrilled Albert Einstein, had he lived long enough to see them.The world-renown scientist will be there in spirit, no doubt, because “all nuclear and particle physicists owe a debt to Einstein,” says Robert Crease, a Stony Brook professor and the lab’s official historian who wrote “Making Physics: The first 25 years of the history of BNL” and is now working on the sequel.WHAT A PAIR: David Rothman was in his work clothes and Albert Einstein was dressed for the beach when they posed on this rock at Horseshoe Cove in Nassau Point in the summer of 1939.(Photo by Reginald Donahue/Courtesy the Rothmans)The circular subterranean electro-magnetic corridor collider, known as RHIC (pronounced “Rick”) for short, “relies very essentially on Einstein’s theory of relativity,” says Berndt Mueller, BNL’s associate director for nuclear and particle physics, because it explores a non-linear strong force similar to gravity.  “If Einstein were alive today, I think he would be very fascinated by the results.”For Einstein, who died in 1955, Long Island only meant a place where he could enjoy himself.In 1937 the Long-Islander mentioned that Einstein had “passed the summer” at Maud Klots’ home on West Shore Road, which runs along Huntington Harbor, and sailed to Halesite to pick up his mail.  If he made much of a splash on his vacation, it didn’t last long.The same can’t be said for the memorable months he spent out east in 1939 when he rented a cottage on Nassau Point in Cutchogue so he could put his sailboat in Horseshoe Cove. Before that summer was over Einstein would sign a letter to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt warning him that the United States couldn’t afford to wait while Nazi Germany was possibly making a nuclear weapon.But that dire notion was far from his mind when he took his sister Maja, his step-daughter Margot, his son Hans, and his secretary Helen Dukas to the North Fork. They even brought a little Airedale terrier that scratched frantically at a door in the living room whenever Einstein would try to close it, prompting him to ask a visitor once: “Do you suppose he can see the door is contracting in the direction of its motion, and he does not know what to make of it and it makes him angry?”The answer eluded him but the question showed how he thought, even on holiday. His summer place is still there on West Cove Road (Einstein had misspelled it “Grove” in a letter). The house has changed, and the neighborhood has grown, but he might recognize the lingering sentiment. A local woman named Louise Thompson, whose parents lived across the street from him, recalled in a story that Newsday ran on the centennial of his birth in 1979, that he had “wanted to have access to the beach through our property [and] my mother wasn’t too interested in that.” After all, she said her mother told him, “Professor Einstein, you are here for privacy and so are we.”Apparently the younger generation on Nassau Point didn’t appreciate the two main activities Einstein did to occupy his time there: sailing and violin playing. Einstein, who never learned to swim, had no pretentions about his nautical prowess. He had named his 17-foot glorified rowboat the Tinef, which is supposedly Yiddish for junk.“We kids who were growing up here know how to sail. He didn’t,” Thompson said. “He’d tip over, and once I can remember some of the local boys going out to rescue him.”That wasn’t an uncommon occurrence, apparently, with Einstein at the helm. After a sailing mishap in the Long Island Sound when his family had rented a cottage at Old Lyme, Conn., in 1935, the New York Times ran the headline, “Relative Tide and Sand Bars Trap Einstein.”Thompson and her Peconic peers weren’t much impressed with Einstein’s musical prowess, either, perhaps because he’d play his instrument “all the time” on his porch during those summer evenings and “we kids didn’t think much of it. We thought he was terrible.”Fortunately, Einstein had a big fan in Southold. David Rothman, who had opened Rothman’s Department Store in 1919, hadn’t graduated high school but he had maintained an avid interest in science. He recognized Einstein’s stepdaughter Margot when she entered his store looking for a chisel sharpener (she was a sculptor). Rothman presented it to her as a gift and asked her to convey his “respects to her father,” as he recalled.The next day, Einstein came into the store himself looking for “sundials.” Or so Rothman thought and he dutifully showed him the one he had in the backyard. Einstein pointed to his feet. He really needed sandals, so Rothman sold him the largest pair he had left: women’s size 11. Einstein, who’d described himself in a letter to a friend as “a kind of ancient figure known primarily for his non-use of socks and wheeled out on special occasions as a curiosity,” gladly wore them all summer, along with a pair of shorts tied around his waist with a piece of rope, and a white sports shirt.When the 60-year-old scientist had first entered his store, Rothman, then 43, was playing Mozart’s “Symphony No. 40” on his phonograph and they started talking about music. Rothman had begun playing the violin when he was 36; Einstein had started when he was six, but he insisted they play together. The next evening Rothman came out to Nassau Point with his instrument and some sheet music, but he was out of his league almost immediately and so they spent the rest of the night chatting. They clicked, and later Rothman arranged many musical evenings at his Southold home where Einstein and a few friends would play. Sometimes almost a hundred people listened outside, hoping for a glimpse of the famous scientist.Rothman’s recollections of his experiences with his celebrated companion have been published by his daughter Joan Rothman Brill and his grandsons Ron Rothman, a talented guitarist who runs the Southold store today, and Chuck Rothman, a science fiction writer living in Schenectady.Ron Rothman, who runs Rothman’s Department Store in Southold, holds the book he published that recounts his grandfather’s friendship with Albert Einstein in 1939. (Photo by Spencer Rumsey/Long Island Press)“The way I see it,” says Ron Rothman, “that summer my grandfather palled around with Albert Einstein to the point where he would come in and he would sleep on the couch. He would spend time playing music, and they would go around doing things.” In the photos of his “gramps” and the scientist, Einstein is in vacation mode casual, while Rothman is wearing a business suit because “that’s the way people dressed for work then,” his grandson says with a smile.One day Rothman waited hours for Einstein, who had planned to sail around Nassau Point to Southold. It was almost dark when the phone rang at his store, as he reminisced to Newsday. On the line was a New York City cop on vacation, who shouted, “Rothman, there’s some wild-looking guy that needs a haircut—some helluva looking looney—down here on the beach wanting to know where you live!”Another time Einstein had just come back from sailing and Rothman was talking to him on his porch when two harried young Hungarian physicists living in exile, Leo Szilard and Eugene Wigner, drove up. They’d come from Manhattan to see him and couldn’t find the cottage until a kid in town had told them which one it was. Szilard, who had studied with Einstein in Berlin and even shared a patent with him for a “new, noiseless refrigerator,” was on an urgent mission because he’d had the disturbing revelation that uranium could be used to create a nuclear chain reaction.“I never thought of that!” Einstein exclaimed in German. The two Hungarians first thought they’d get Einstein to write the queen of Belgium, Einstein’s friend, and warn her that if the Germans conquered her country, they’d gain control over the Belgian Congo, which then had the world’s largest supply of uranium. He agreed. Szilard, “who was nothing if not obsessive,” according to biographer Jeremy Bernstein, wanted to reach President Roosevelt, and so through his connections at Columbia University, he contacted one of FDR’s economics advisers, Alexander Sachs, who agreed to carry a letter to the president if it had Einstein’s signature. By that point, Wigner had gone to California so Szilard got another Hungarian physicist with a driver’s license, Edward Teller, to go back out to Nassau Point. After completing two versions, a long one and a short one, Einstein signed them both on Aug. 9, warning the president about “extremely powerful bombs of a new type.”By 1939, Einstein had come to regard the use of force as the only way to stop fascism—but he never worked on the Manhattan Project although his letter was its spark.Sachs gave Einstein’s letter to Roosevelt on Oct. 11, a month after Hitler had invaded Poland. The next morning Roosevelt created the Advisory Committee on Uranium, naming Szilard, Wigner and Teller to it, but not Einstein, perhaps because FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, no friend of German Jews trying to emigrate, had viewed Einstein as a security risk because he’d previously proclaimed in Europe that “I am a militant pacifist” and he kept a large file on him once he came to America.A man of peace, Einstein would have appreciated that, since the former Camp Upton’s reincarnation as a national laboratory in 1947, the BNL never did weapons research. For decades scientists there have been committed to exploring the inner workings of the atom to advance human understanding—although their research is always at the mercy of Congressional largesse and that’s never predictable.FINE FIDDLER: Albert Einstein, playing his violin in David Rothman’s living room, told the Southold department store owner he’d had the best summer of his life thanks to him. (Photo by David Rothman)According to his many biographers, Einstein—“the last of the great classical physicists”—may have not liked being in a classroom (in Germany his teachers called him a “dreamy” child) but he loved sharing the profound joy he found in physics, and that’s why he was determined to explain one of his theories to Rothman before he returned to the Institute of Advanced Studies at Princeton. After all, when Einstein published his relativity paper in 1905, he didn’t even have a Ph.D. and was working in a patent office.Einstein’s goal with Rothman, as Rothman told his daughter, was to demonstrate to his friend Dr. Gustav Bucky, another esteemed physicist who’d come out to Nassau Point to visit him that summer, “that a layman, in fact a mere merchant, could comprehend these problems.” Rothman’s only stipulation was that the great scientist should not use math since he’d never gone past eighth grade. Einstein assured his friend it could be done. “You know, I use no instruments,” Einstein told him. “My tools are simply a pad and a pencil. This is all I have ever needed.”What he’d make of BNL’s multi-million-dollar high tech tool for experimental physics can only be left for speculation. According to researchers familiar with his archives, Einstein never visited the lab.What is known is that on a Sunday afternoon in 1939 the most famous scientist of the 20th century and the Southold department store owner spent three hours together wrestling with the problem: why a spinning rod contracts in the direction of its motion as it approaches the speed of light.“I got nowhere in trying to grasp what he wanted me to,” Rothman recalled ruefully, and he lamented to Einstein that “the whole pad was full of mathematical symbols.” Einstein insisted that the math he was using was “quite trivial.” Rothman never understood the answer but he treasured the sheet that Einstein had covered in calculations, and his offspring later sold it for thousands of dollars to a collector.The day before Einstein left the East End, Rothman came out to Nassau Point to see him off and he was presented with a new biography that had just come out, “Einstein: The Maker of Universes.” Einstein had inscribed it, in German: “May this book remind you of the happy times we spent together in the summer of 1939.” It was signed simply: “A. Einstein.”Then, when Rothman took his hand to say good-bye, Einstein “put one arm affectionately around my shoulder and said, ‘You know, this has been one of the most beautiful summers of my whole life…’”And to think it happened on Long Island.last_img read more

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How to develop your financial institution’s COVID-19 return-to-work policy

first_img continue reading » While many stay-at-home orders have been extended, some states are allowing at least some businesses to reopen. It is important for organizations to realize the need for advanced planning of their return-to-work strategy to ensure a smooth transition.The following best practices will provide guidance to consider while creating your institution’s return-to-work policy. While this guidance is not legal advice, it is a helpful source for getting started and can help you create a measured approach to your policy.Review Federal, State and Local PlansFirst, it is important to review any applicable federal, state and local recovery plans, including each state’s local stay-at-home orders. Some states may even have a posted recovery plan that your institution may leverage. If you are a larger multi-state institution, you may want to include the proposed recovery plan from the CDC and the White House in your decision-making process. Or, if you are a smaller institution located in a single state or in a handful of states, you may want to consider looking at a specific state’s recovery plan, such as the state of Missouri’s plan. Both plans incorporate and rely on guidance from medical professionals, which is important as you may not want to rush employees back too soon. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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IRS must pay $100 million worth of $1,200 stimulus checks, judge orders in prisoners’ lawsuit

first_imgOn September 24, 2020 U.S. District Court Judge Phyllis Hamilton issued an order certifying a nationwide class of incarcerated individuals as well as granting a preliminary injunction requiring the IRS and Treasury Department to stop withholding stimulus checks solely on the basis of their incarceration status.Judge Hamilton also required the government to reconsider prior denials of stimulus check applications that were due to the incarceration status of a person within 30 days. To ensure accountability, Hamilton ordered that “within 45 days, defendants [IRS and Treasury] shall file a declaration confirming these steps have been implemented, including data regarding the number and amount of benefits that have been disbursed.”As of May, 2020, at least 80,000 incarcerated individuals were eligible for economic impact payments of over $100 million, according to a report by the Treasury Department’s Inspector General. These individuals should, therefore, receive a much needed financial infusion in the coming months. Other incarcerated individuals who may not have filed a claim are also eligible now. “The country is suffering during this pandemic and economic crisis, and incarcerated people and the families they rely on for support are no exception,” said Yaman Salahi, a Partner at Lieff, Cabraser, Heimann & Bernstein, who is representing the Plaintiffs and Class. “Judge Hamilton’s order ensures that incarcerated people will receive the sorely needed economic assistance that Congress allocated.” continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Veteran Who Died at Northport VA Was Loving Family Man, Relative Says

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Peter Kaisen, the 76-year-old veteran found dead in the parking lot of the Northport Veterans Affairs Medical Center this weekend, was a doting family man who enjoyed watching NASCAR on television and playing the role of grandfather.“He was a family man,” his 51-year-old son-in-law Brian Henke told the Press in a phone interview Thursday. “Loved NASCAR, loved animals, [loved] his three daughters and seven grandchildren.”“He was very good,” Henke said of his father-in-law, a retired police officer who was injured in the line of duty. “Very caring for his children and grandchildren.”But as with many U.S. military veterans, Kaisen had his own struggles. He was a regular patient at the Northport VAMC, and the family believes Kaisen may have been suffering from depression, Henke said.Kaisen’s last visit to the VA came this past weekend. He died in the parking lot of a hospital where many veterans like himself have sought much-needed help.Related: “Report: Denied Service, Veteran Commits Suicide at Northport VA Hospital”According to a report in The New York Times, two anonymous Northport VA hospital workers said Kaisen was turned away Sunday afternoon as he sought treatment at the medical center’s emergency room.Kaisen then went outside to his car and, according to the report, committed suicide.Asked whether the family has been in touch with the VA hospital in Northport, Henke said, “We haven’t talked to anybody.”The family has no evidence to support the allegations from two anonymous sources quoted by the Times that Kaisen was turned away from the emergency room when he tried to seek treatment.Photo of Peter Kaisen that appeared on a funeral home’s website.One anonymous source told the Times that Kaisen “went to the E.R. and was denied service.”Another worker interviewed by the paper was critical of the Northport VAMC’s apparent handling of Kaisen’s case.“Someone dropped the ball,” the hospital staffer was quoted as saying. “They should not have turned him away.”The hospital released a statement through a spokesman Thursday afternoon that expressed sorrow for Kaisen’s demise but did not acknowledge the cause of death.“The employees here at Northport feel this loss deeply and extend their thoughts and prayers to all those impacted by this tragedy,” the statement said. “We are committed to addressing the needs of all Veterans who are in crisis, and want Veterans and their loved ones to know we stand ready to help whenever possible.”Update: “Long Island Vet’s Life of Devotion, Love & Sacrifice Ends With Tragic Questions”Suffolk County Police Acting Commissioner Justin Meyers said the department was alerted to the incident at 12:07 p.m. Kaisen’s lifeless body was found near his Toyota when officers arrived.The FBI is now investigating the incident.“He was a family man. Loved NASCAR, loved animals, [loved] his three daughters and seven grandchildren.”Reps. Peter King (R-Seaford) and Steve Israel (D-Dix Hills) on Thursday wrote a joint letter to the heads of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Commissioner and the FBI demanding a thorough and transparent investigation.“It is critical that our nation’s veterans feel they can trust the services provided by their VA medical facilities, and that their health and well-being is of the utmost priority,” the letter states. “This trust must extend not only to medical treatment provided in operating rooms and primary care facilities, but also to the mental health services provided by all VA facilities.“We demand that the FBI conduct a thorough, expeditious and transparent investigation into this incident, and we demand that the VA is transparent and fully cooperative in every aspect of the FBI’s investigation,” it continues. “Only a thorough and transparent report on the cause of this incident will ensure that the VA maintains the confidence of our veterans who have sacrificed so much for our nation.”Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley) has reached out to the Northport VA hospital’s director, according to his spokeswoman, but it was unclear if the congressman gleaned any new information from the conversation.Kaisen’s tragic death has prompted an outpouring of support from veterans and civilians alike.As for how Kaisen would have liked to be remembered, Henke said, “He didn’t want a lot known about him. He was a quiet person.”Summing up how many people feel after hearing of Kaisen’s passing, Henke said, “We need better care for our U.S. veterans.”Kaisen’s body, according to a funeral home’s posting, will be cremated.last_img read more

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Finally synergy. Cres and Lošinj together in the development of a tourism development strategy

first_imgCres and Lošinj together in the development of a tourism development strategy until 2030, and will be done by Horwath Consulting.Namely, at the last session of the Tourist Board of the Cres Tourist Board, a decision was made on the development of the Tourism Development Strategy of the Cres-Lošinj archipelago until 2030. “Our two environments, Cres and Lošinj, have a lot of similarities, and guests see us as a unique destination. Therefore, we decided to develop a joint development strategy, and a company with an international reputation, Horwath Consulting, was chosen to prepare this strategic document in the coming years.”Pointed out the mayor of Cres, Kristijan Jurjako, who is also the president of the Tourist Board, Novi list writes.In the first nine months, almost 900.000 overnight stays were realized on Cres, 2,5% more than last year. After an excellent pre-season, there is no post-season behind, so, thanks to the nice weather, Cres welcomes mid-October with about 500 guests, 40% more than last year at the same timeAt the same session, the Tourist Council made a decision to relocate the offices of the Cres Tourist BoardPhoto: Bokanews.comSince the tourist office operates in a cramped and inadequate space, it was decided to move to a new office building that is currently being built on Peškera. It is expected that the building will be finished in the spring, and the Cres tourist board could welcome the next season in new, more appropriate premises.Together, Cres and Lošinj are certainly stronger, and as they are connected or connected by a bridge, they will now join forces with the “tourist” bridge and thus certainly contribute to a better, more diverse and higher quality tourist product.Source: NoviListlast_img read more

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COVID-19 deaths top 4,000 in under-fire Sweden

first_imgState epidemiologist Anders Tegnell of the Public Health Agency stressed countries’ death tolls should be compared with caution.”In Sweden, anybody who has the diagnosis of COVID-19 and dies within 30 days after that is called a COVID-19 case, irrespective of the actual cause of death. And we know that in many other countries there are other ways of counting that are used,” he told AFP. Topics :  ‘Getting better’ Tegnell has repeatedly insisted that stricter measures would not have saved more Swedish lives.Three-quarters of those who have died have been either in nursing homes or receiving at-home care.Tegnell noted that a ban on visits to nursing homes was introduced in mid-March, but said elderly residents needed regular contact with their carers — who were believed to have spread the virus around many nursing homes.”I’m really not sure that we could have done so much more,” he said in a weekend interview with Swedish Radio, acknowledging nonetheless that the country had ended up in a “terrible situation that highlights the weaknesses of our elderly care.”He said care homes had initially failed to respect basic hygiene rules that could have curbed the spread of the disease, but said the situation had since improved.The Board of Health and Welfare meanwhile insisted Sweden’s nursing homes were functioning well. It noted that a total of 11,000 nursing home residents died in January-April this year, compared with 10,000 during the same period a year ago.And Tegnell told reporters Monday that the overall situation in Sweden “was getting better,” with a declining number of people being admitted to intensive care units, a drop in the number of cases being reported in nursing homes, and fewer deaths in nursing homes. According to AFP’s own database, Sweden’s virus death rate of 399 per million inhabitants is far higher than Norway’s 43 per million, Denmark’s 97, or Finland’s 55.However it is still lower than for France at 435 per million, Britain and Italy, both at 542, and Spain at 615.Critics have accused Swedish authorities of gambling with citizens’ lives by not imposing strict stay-at-home measures. But the Public Health Agency has insisted its approach is sustainable in the long-term and has rejected drastic short-term measures as too ineffective to justify their impact on society.The Scandinavian country has kept schools open for children under the age of 16, along with cafes, bars, restaurants and businesses, while urging people to respect social distancing and hygiene guidelines. Sweden, which has gained international attention for its softer approach to the coronavirus than many of its European neighbors, said on Monday its number of deaths passed the 4,000 mark.The Public Health Agency said it had recorded 4,029 deaths and 33,843 confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus in the country of some 10.3 million inhabitants, with 90 percent of the deceased over the age of 70.Sweden’s death toll has far surpassed the tolls in neighboring Nordic countries, which have all imposed more restrictive containment measures.last_img read more

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Trump-Biden debate could spark stock volatility

first_imgSome United States stocks could face more volatility next week as President Donald Trump and rival Joe Biden face off in their first debate ahead of a November election that betting services currently view as almost a coin flip.A strong performance in Tuesday’s debate by Biden, who currently has a modest lead in betting odds and polls, might boost stocks related to global trade and renewable energy, while a perceived debate victory by Trump could benefit fossil fuel and defense companies.The first of three scheduled debates comes at a fraught moment on Wall Street. The Sept. 26, 2016 debate between Trump and Hillary Clinton, for example, sparked a 2 percent surge in the Mexican peso, as well as moves in oil, gold and Treasuries, according to a University of Michigan and Dartmouth College study.Many investors view Biden as more likely to raise taxes, and see a second term for Trump, who favors deregulation, as better for the overall stock market. At the same time, a Trump win could spark concerns over ramped up tensions between Washington and Beijing.With expectations of a delayed vote count, the options market shows investors are bracing for volatility in November and December. Trump declined on Wednesday to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses, and said he expected the election battle to end up before the Supreme Court.Adding to political uncertainty, betting websites are offering odds giving Biden a 53 percent chance of beating Trump, down from as much as 61 percent in early August, according to RealClearPolitics.A Biden win could boost the S&P 500 by about 1 percent the following day, while a Trump re-election would push the index down about 4 percent, according to an analysis by Cornerstone Macro based on a statistical comparison of recent asset prices and election betting odds.“A possible interpretation of this result is that markets have increasingly priced in a Biden win and view the alternative as posing some risks, possibly stemming from potential escalating trade tensions or similar factors,” Cornerstone Marco wrote.Gullane Capital Partners LLC, a hedge fund in Memphis, Tennessee, is focusing on each presidential candidate’s likely effect on specific stocks it owns, rather than what each candidate might mean for Wall Street as a whole, said Managing Partner Trip Miller.“Biden is good for some of our businesses, like solar, and Trump is better for some of our other businesses that benefit from lighter regulation,” Miller said.UBS in a report this week predicted that a second term for Trump would have little effect on healthcare. On the other hand, a Biden victory would lead to only modest changes, rather than a major overhaul of health insurance, even if Democrats took control of the Senate.“We believe that the rhetoric on changes to healthcare policy exceeds the reality of what can be accomplished,” UBS analysts wrote.Topics : The S&P 500 tumbled around 10 percent from record highs in recent weeks before paring some of those losses on Friday, as investors worry about a prolonged recovery from the coronavirus and uncertainty related to the Nov. 3 presidential vote, including the possibility of a delay in announcing a winner.If one candidate emerges stronger on Tuesday, “the debate could be an individual stock and sector play,” said Jack Ablin, Chief Investment Officer at Cresset Wealth Advisors.“For example, I think life under Biden would be a lot simpler for Apple than life under Trump,” Ablin said, referring to Trump’s trade conflict with China.Individual stocks and other assets have been susceptible to market moves as a result of debates, even as broader markets have generally shrugged them off.last_img read more