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Braun working to prevent PPP loans from being declared as taxable income

first_img Twitter Braun working to prevent PPP loans from being declared as taxable income By Network Indiana – December 23, 2020 1 366 CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Pinterest Twitter Pinterest Google+ (Photo supplied/Indiana Senate Republcians) Senator Mike Braun is hoping to shore up the latest COVID relief bill passed by Congress, by making sure the IRS doesn’t come knocking on your door if you don’t claim a PPP loan on your taxes.Just like the previous relief bill, there is no specific language with the new COVID relief bill that exempts you from claiming PPP loans at income for your business.“That’s going to get cleared up,” Braun told Fox News. “Because that would be an abomination if business owners had to declare that as income.”Braun was the one who wrote legislation last time to make sure that businesses were protected from paying taxes on PPP loans. He plans to do the same thing again this time around.Braun voted in favor of the COVID relief bill, but was wary in doing so, saying that the country needs to start finding ways to shore up spending so that the national debt, which sits at $27 trillion, doesn’t inflate too much more. Previous articleIndiana seeking part-time help with COVID responseNext articleIndiana health leaders believe state’s COVID-19 positivity rate has been understated Network Indiana Facebook WhatsApp Facebook WhatsApp Google+last_img read more

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Buckethead Reveals Life-Threatening Heart Condition And Recent Heart Surgery In New Interview

first_img[H/T Loudwire] On a recent episode of the podcast Coming Alive hosted by Barry Michels and Paul Stutz, guitar virtuoso and former Guns N’ Roses member Buckethead revealed that he’s been struggling with a life-threatening heart condition. In the hourlong episode, he revealed that he has had an ongoing “heart problem where my heart beats out of rhythm,” though recently, the condition has worsened, to the point where doctors warned he was on the brink of having a stroke. During the interview, he talked about a heart surgery he recently underwent as well, though procedure did not seem to help his condition.Bootsy Collins And Buckethead Have A Collaborative Album In The WorksUnsurprisingly, the prolific guitarist who has already recorded over 300 studio albums at the age of 48 also noted that following his surgery, while he was bedridden the day after the procedure, he recorded a new album. During the interview, Buckethead also elaborated on the surgery, “They suggested I had a thing called an ablation, they go in and freeze your heart. It’s supposed to do something with the nerves, because they said my heart was fine, but it could be a genetic thing, they didn’t really know. I had that procedure, and it didn’t really stop it, and I’m still dealing with it. I take medication, which is tough, because I never took anything my whole life, although if I eat food or drink something that’s probably worse anyway (laughs). So it’s been really difficult, because it’s scary because it comes on. Even walking across a room is difficult, luckily the medication I’m thankful for, because it’s kept it from going berserk, but it’s pretty intense.”Celebrate Les Claypool’s Birthday By Watching Him, Bernie Worrell, Buckethead, & Brain Jam [Full Show]While this is terrifying news for anyone to receive, Buckethead seems to be taking his medical condition in stride, adding, “It seems like now I’m letting this thing sort of exist now in me, I can’t really escape it. . . . it definitely kind of scares me, but I also see that it is also doing a lot of good, because I need to do all of the things I want to do. . . . I could be gone tomorrow, anybody could be gone, but that’s a heavy experience. I want to play right now, and I want to play that experience.”Buckethead Plays Star Wars Medley In Colorado [Video]Live For Live Music is sending love to Buckethead and wishing him the best of health during his recovery process. You can listen to the full Coming Alive podcast below.last_img read more

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Bonnaroo Reveals 2019 Lineup Featuring 2 Days Of Phish & Much More

first_imgTHE COMPLETE BONNAROO 2019 LINEUP IS BELOW:THURSDAY, JUNE 13Grand Ole Opry Featuring Special GuestsSabaSpace Jesus b2b Eprom b2b Shlump12th PlanetSunsquabiAll Them WitchesMagic City HippiesThe Nude PartyRolling Blackouts Coastal FeverThe Comet Is ComingJack HarlowEpromCaroline RoseDonna MissalPeach PitHeklerDorfex Bos*****FRIDAY, JUNE 14Phish (Late Evening Set)Childish GambinoSolangeThe Avett BrothersBrockhamptonGRiZRL GrimeBeach HouseGRiZ SuperJamNGHTMREGojiraCourtney BarnettGirl TalkAJRCatfish And The BottlemenK.FlayAnoushka ShankarNahko & Medicine For The PeopleLiquid StrangerDeafheavenParquet CourtsRival SonsIbeyiJade CicadaLas CafeterasCherry GlazerrThe Teskey BrothersMedasinTyla YawehDuckyMonsieur PerinéMersivCrooked Colours*****SATURDAY, JUNE 15Post MaloneOdeszaHozierKacey MusgravesThe NationalThe Lonely IslandZHUJuice WRLDJoe Russo’s Almost DeadGucci ManeJohn PrineJim James (Full Band)Maren MorrisGramatikShovels & RopeUnknown Mortal OrchestraQuinn XCIIClairoBishop BriggsHippo CampusSpace JesusTokimonstaChelsea CutlerThe Record CompanySNBRNRuston KellyWhipped CreamRubblebucketLittle SimzMembaDeva MahalDJ Mel*****SUNDAY, JUNE 16Phish (2 Sets)The LumineersCardi BBrandi CarlileIlleniumWalk The MoonMac DeMarcoKing PrincessLil DickyG JonesTrampled By TurtlesThe Wood BrothersHobo Johnson & The LovemakersPrincess (Featuring Maya Rudolph & Gretchen Lieberum)The Soul RebelsThe Lemon TwigsTwo FeetAC SlaterCIDDombreskyBombinoFaye WebsterRipeKikagaku MoyoIgloohostView Full Lineup Today, event organizers have revealed the initial artist lineup for the 2019 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival. As always, the 18th-annual edition of the festival, set to take place June 13th–16th, will go down at The Farm at Great Stage Park, the spectacular 700-acre event space located 60 miles southeast of Nashville in Manchester, TN.The lineup features a wide array of pop, hip-hop, and electronic artists, and while it continues the festival’s recent trend of moving toward more mainstream acts, there’s plenty to be excited about for jam fans. The slate of artists includes two nights of Phish—including one set late in the evening on Friday and two more on Sunday—Childish Gambino, The Avett Brothers, GRiZ (as well as a GRiZ-led Superjam), Post Malone, Cardi B, Brandi Carlile, Grand Ole Opry featuring Special Guests, Mac DeMarco, Lil Dicky, Odesza, Hozier, Kacey Musgraves, The National, comedic music group The Lonely Island, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, John Prine, Jim James (Full Band), Maren Morris, Gramatik, Bishop Briggs, The Record Company, Rubblebucket, The Lumineers, Solange, The National, The Wood Brothers, The Soul Rebels, Kikagaku Moyo, SunSquabi, and many, many more.The festival has also announced a number of new features for 2019, including a “Sanctuary of Self-Love” campground experience curated by Paramore‘s Hayley Williams, wild theme parties and the event’s first-ever Pride parade hosted by House of Yes‘ “The Yes Barn,” a Nashville-centric food and art village called “The Ville,” a newly-opened wooded hangout area on the venue’s Eastern woods, and more. You can get more information about the Bonnaroo 2019 campground experience here.Check out the full lineup below.For more information, head to the Bonnaroo website.last_img read more

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An engineering landmark

first_imgIn all the history of applied science, 50 years is not much. After all, Imhotep — reputed to be the world’s first engineer — designed a pyramid more than 47 centuries ago.But in one corner of Harvard University this month, 50 years is a mark that has great meaning.On Oct. 1, the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) celebrated the 50th anniversary of ABET accreditation for its Scientiæ Baccalaureus (S.B.) degree in engineering sciences. ABET stands for Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, and its imprimatur is required as a first step toward a license for becoming a professional engineer.This accredited degree was the only S.B. offered at Harvard for nearly all of the past 50 years. But in May, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences voted to make electrical engineering and mechanical engineering stand-alone concentrations starting this semester. Both will now earn concentrators the S.B. degree, which — as always — requires an undergraduate thesis.ABET accreditation for these two new degrees may come sooner than the four- to five-year waiting period normally required. But at any rate, such accreditation is retroactive.The new S.B. concentrations are part of a trend at SEAS to broaden opportunities within engineering programs — and to integrate liberal arts more fully with the sciences. In 2010, Harvard College launched a new concentration — biomedical engineering (B.M.E.) — that integrates engineering and life sciences. It will lead to a traditional A.B. (Artium Baccalaureus) degree.That makes two new S.B. degrees at Harvard, and one that has been accredited now for 50 years. But engineering study goes much further back in University history — to 1847 and the founding of the Lawrence Scientific School. Science, of a sort, had been part of the Harvard College curriculum for two centuries earlier — astronomy, in particular. But Lawrence Scientific was Harvard’s first effort at providing advanced education in applied science. Celebrated Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz was one of the first hires, and taught zoology and geology.But there was institutional prejudice in the 19th century against adding the sciences to a liberal arts education. So Lawrence Scientific struggled, and twice was close to joining the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. But Agassiz protégé Nathaniel Shaler, who was dean of Lawrence Scientific starting in 1891, worked hard to right the Harvard science ship, and by 1902 enrollment was at an all-time high. In 1906, Lawrence Scientific dissolved and in part became the Graduate School of Applied Science — the first iteration of SEAS.Over the years, students and faculty continued to devise creative solutions to the problems of their day. Pictured is Physics Professor G.W. Pierce (1872-1956) and his “super sound detector.” Pierce is credited with assisting in the development of electronic communications. Photograph ca. 1930. Courtesy of University Film Foundation Repository/Harvard University ArchivesBut in all those years, before and after 1906, engineering study remained the same in principle: the intersection of scientific precision with the forces of the real world. Agassiz traveled the globe to collect specimens and study glaciers. There are photographs of Shaler, sleeves rolled up, collecting rocks in remote corners of New England. And one 1902 photograph shows a group of rugged-looking students at a Harvard engineering camp at Squam Lake, N.H. Two are smoking pipes; one is holding an ax.Over the years, students and faculty continued to devise creative solutions to the problems of their day. And what students they were. Among them: William James, the philosopher and pioneering psychologist who once collected Amazon River fish for Agassiz; Norman Mailer, who studied aeronautical engineering at Harvard; and Bill Gates, along with Microsoft partner Steven A. Ballmer.Consider too these sample inventions from Harvard engineering programs: baking powder (1859); the crystal oscillator (1919), which held radio frequencies fixed and which made multiple phone calls possible over a single line; the largest cyclotron in the world (1938); one of the first electromechanical computers (1944); and one of the first attempts at a virtual reality device (1966).Add this: Harvard’s Lene Hau and her team brought a beam of light to a complete stop, then started it up again.Just last week, in a sun-filled laboratory at Pierce Hall, engineering undergraduates used metered electrodes to test samples from the Charles River and three other bodies of water. For safety, they wore white Tyvek coats, blue latex gloves, and eye protection.Their mission that afternoon: to use a series of these probes to test the water for traces of iron, calcium, sodium, and other elements, additives, and contaminants.Anas Chalah (right), director of SEAS’s teaching labs, leads an environmental engineering class testing water samples in a Pierce Hall laboratory. Photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer“It doesn’t get any more real than this,” said Anas Chalah, director of SEAS’s teaching labs, as he stood by to answer student questions. The same kind of work — with clean beakers, probes, meters, and recording charts — is what engineers do to test water quality every day, all over the world. “You cannot teach environmental engineering,” Chalah said, “without hands-on experience.”In a university setting there are constraints on fieldwork, of course, and consequently, experiments are often designed to mimic real-world conditions. In the corridor outside the Pierce Hall lab, for instance, are two machines that simulate renewable energy — one from the sun (with lamps) and the other from wind (with fans).Of course, such machines can’t measure real energy efficiencies: They use power to create power. “We are clear about our limits,” said Chalah, imparting yet another engineering lesson. “But at the end of the day, students get the point.”last_img read more

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Wielding chainsaws for science

first_imgOn a warm afternoon in Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum, John DelRosso embarked on a task that was part detective work, part tough love, and reached for his chainsaw.He was 40 feet up in a 137-year-old maple whose thin crown and dying branches attested to the fact that it had seen better days. DelRosso pruned away dead branches, then focused his attention on living wood, cutting branches that to the layman might seem fine, but to the chief arborist’s eye bore tiny holes that spoke of infestation.But infestation with what?An hour later, the branches were a mile away in Roslindale, safely sealed in a barrel, where they will stay for the next two years. Over that time, insects within the wood will develop, emerge, and fall into an attached liquid trap, where forest managers and scientists can collect and identify them.The barrel is among 48 resting on racks in an otherwise unremarkable garage, next to stacked lumber, snowplows, and other off-season equipment for the Arboretum. It is part of a partnership between the Arboretum and the U.S. Forest Service that is unusual because it has put two organizations that typically fight forest pests into the business of rearing them.By storing suspect branches and logs in closed containers, the program aims to take the guesswork out of identifying so-called “cryptic borers,” insects that do their damage hidden beneath the bark before emerging as a new generation of adults.“At any opportunity, we take advantage of engaging, working, and collaborating with outside experts on the various factors that affect the health of our collections,” said Andrew Gapinski, the Arboretum’s manager of horticulture. “This partnership is one of many cooperative engagements, from soils to exotic pests, we are working to establish. We are continuously looking to adapt our management approaches through new information, to apply the most effective and sustainable methods to care for our collections.”William “Ned” Friedman, Arnold Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, displays specimens collected from Arboretum trees. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerThe program serves multiple purposes, organizers said. The most obvious is to help managers understand the condition of their trees and decide on the best management strategy to address concerns. But the program also serves a broader scientific mission, identifying insect species moving into New England, and potentially through North America, for the first time and uncovering associations between existing species, such as the serviceberry branches that yielded bark beetles not previously linked to attacking it.“We expect to find new host relationships,” said Mike Bohne, forest health group leader for the Forest Service in New York and New England. “Insects are shifting their range … The Southern pine beetle was never known to occur in New York and New England, and just in the past few years we found it infesting thousands of trees on Long Island, and we’ve trapped it throughout Massachusetts.”The efforts can also point toward cures. Parasitic wasps, for example — whose larvae grow inside the destructive beetles, killing them — are sometimes found in the barrels. New knowledge of these parasitic associations can give managers added tools, like the option of rearing and releasing such wasps as bio-controls into areas where outbreaks occur.The program was initially begun by the Forest Service in Washington, D.C., to augment traditional monitoring traps, which use an attractant. The drawback of those traps is that they are not effective in capturing all types of pests. Furthermore, traps may show what’s flying around in a forest, but can’t tell researchers which species and individual trees are infested. The Washington program, Bohne said, enlisted city residents to identify street trees infested with pests, which were then cut and reared in an effort to find out what was causing the decline.Andrew Gapinski (left), manager of horticulture at the Arnold Arboretum, and John DelRosso identify pests that live hidden in wood. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerBohne cited the major advantages of working with a world-class arboretum. Its diversity of trees — the Arnold has 15,000 woody plants and more than 2,100 species from around the world — provides an opportunity to sample a huge diversity of plant material. Second is the presence of trained staff like DelRosso, who has been the Arnold’s head arborist for 16 years. Third is its recordkeeping, Bohne said. Trees at the Arboretum have “provenance,” and the history of most specimens is known. Arboretum records, for example, show that the tree DelRosso trimmed is a Rugel sugar maple in “poor” condition, supplied by C.G. Pringle of Charlotte, Vt., and planted into the living collection on Feb. 1, 1880.“Using the arborists, they’re skilled, they know what to look for,” Bohne said. “Because the Arboretum has everything mapped so well, we know exactly where in the Arboretum it came from … It gives us a lot of information.”The program expanded to the Arboretum in 2015 and is also being implemented at Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, N.Y. So far, Bohne said, Forest Service scientists have collected 1,496 beetles representing 102 species from the Arboretum’s drums.Arboretum Director William “Ned” Friedman, the Arnold Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, said the importance of programs like this are only going to increase as the climate shifts and new pests arrive from elsewhere.Recent history illustrates the importance of detecting outbreaks as quickly as possible, Friedman said. In 2008, the Asian long-horned beetle was discovered in Worcester, Mass., after it had already become well-established in the city’s maple trees. In an effort to protect the millions of maples in surrounding forests, wood from the area was quarantined. By 2015, 35,000 trees had been cut down and chipped.The same beetle was discovered in trees near the Arboretum in 2010. That discovery led to imposition of a similar quarantine and the destruction of six infested trees. The quarantine was lifted in 2014, after no more infested trees were discovered.“We could have lost the finest maple collection — some 65 species — in the world,” Friedman said. “One year later, it would have been a totally different story and a disaster. Once they’re out of the bottle — or more accurately, the wood — it’s essentially impossible to put them back in.”last_img read more

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Report sees India’s reliance on thermal power dropping to 50% in 2021, 43% in 2026

first_imgReport sees India’s reliance on thermal power dropping to 50% in 2021, 43% in 2026 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享ETEnergyworld.com:India’s dependence on thermal power will reduce to 50 per cent by 2021-22 and 43 per cent by 2026-27 on the back of renewable energy (RE) capacity additions, a report said. Thermal power includes diesel, gas and coal-based electricity generation which contributes 63 per cent of total electricity generation capacity in India as per the report.“India is chasing ambitious RE targets and enhancing its T&D (transmission & distribution) infrastructure. Increasing RE use is decreasing dependence on coal. Contribution of the thermal sector will reduce to 50 per cent by FY22 and 43 per cent by FY27,” said a report by Praxis Global Alliance and ZetwerkAccording to the report the installed power generation capacity has increased at 8.6 per cent CAGR over the period FY12-FY19 and renewable energy is growing at the fastest pace. New private investment in the generation sector is expected to be largely in the renewable sector, it added.The report showed that owing to past bad experiences, long-term PPAs (power purchase agreement) in thermal power are unlikely to pick-up in the future.Renewables sector is likely to continue with long-term PPAs, it added.More: India’s dependence on thermal power will reduce to 50 per cent by FY22: Reportlast_img read more

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The August Issue of Blue Ridge Outdoors is Live

first_imgDEPARTMENTSQUICK HITSCrowded A.T. • West Virginia’s new bouldering park • New Virginia license plate to honor runner • Gravedigger raceFLASHPOINTOnly 45 red wolves remain in the wild—all in North Carolina. A small group of landowners wants their protections removed. A decision next month will decide whether red wolves go extinct.THE DIRTScott Jurek broke the A.T. speed record last summer. Can his friend and fellow ultrarunner Karl Meltzer notch a new record in 2016?THE GOODSAdventure guide Sara Bell shares her swimming hole gear essentials.TRAIL MIXMandolin master Sam Bush explores his songwriting side on new album.FEATURESADVENTURE UNeed to ditch the books and play hooky? Here are the 10 best college campuses in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic for outdoor adventure.PARK N’ PLAYCelebrate the National Park Service’s 100th birthday by splashing in one of these 10 swimming holes in the Smokies, Shenandoah, and along the Blue Ridge Parkway.FIRED UPSmokey the Bear got it wrong: forests need wildfires to stay healthy. But are we willing to allow wildfires to burn? Fires in Linville and Shenandoah spark new debates.FIRST OBSTACLE COURSEA tough mudder race tests an again dad.last_img read more

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Long Island Slowly Drifting Toward Connecticut

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Illustration by Jon MorenoWASHINGTON, D.C.—The U.S. government released a long-awaited geological report that contains startling news for the New York area.According to data released this morning, the whole of Long Island has begun to slowly drift northeastward, toward Connecticut.“The reason for this is unclear,” said a U.S. Geological Survey spokesperson, “but shock waves from the recent massive earthquakes in the Western Pacific basin might have loosened the crystalline bedrock on which Long Island has rested since the Paleozoic Age.”According to the report, the Island is drifting 96.52 cm (38 in.) per year—slowly enough to escape public notice, but fast enough to cause considerable damage when the North Shore of Long Island inevitably collides with the shoreline of Connecticut.“Shifting tectonic plates in our area,” continued the spokesperson, “could speed up this move dramatically. But it’s too early to calculate exactly how fast the Island will be traveling when it hits the mainland.”According to maps accompanying the report, Brooklyn will graze Westchester County and continue moving in a northeasterly direction until it comes to rest near Greenwich, Conn.On the eastern end, Montauk will wind up moving into Narragansett Bay.Manhattan and the Bronx will then be exposed directly to the Atlantic Ocean, and will develop miles of beaches along the East Side, stretching from Canal Street up to the previous site of the Throgs Neck Bridge. (These new ocean beaches will replace the entire FDR Drive and Avenues C & D.)Northport, LI, will run into Fairfield, Conn., a severe cultural shock for both communities. Not to mention the astonishment of Mattituck residents waking up to see the historic colonial homes of Old Lyme on the outskirts of their farms.Serious political and economic questions arise:Will Long Island continue to be part of New York State? Or will it become part of a new, expanded Connecticut?Will we actually understand our new senators and congressmen if they talk with odd Connecticut accents?Will wealthy residents of Westport and Fairfield be given access to Long Island beaches—or, as the area will be called, the “Connecticut Hamptons”?Will people from Manhattan forsake the Hamptons for the new “Manhattan Riviera”?Will business travelers continue to use LaGuardia and Kennedy airports, since they are now several hours away from Manhattan?And will the Nets and Islanders be able to draw a new fan base from Fairfield County, whose main sporting interests appear to be Jai Alai and World Wrestling?The governors of both states have called for a joint emergency task force to figure out if this “Island Drift” can be stopped, or at least slowed.Private talks with General Electric, manufacturer of some of the most powerful turbine engines in the world, hint at the possibility of multiple turbines being mounted on the North Shore of Long Island to push it back south, to its original location.But it remains unclear how this multi-turbine plan will overcome strict noise and environmental regulations in both Nassau and Suffolk counties.The U.S. Council of Vodka, Gin, Tequila and Rum Distillers were quick to announce their support for this joint task force, due to their serious concerns about whether “Connecticut Iced Tea” will have the same marketing clout as the current “Long Island Iced Tea.”In related news, a rumor that Texas has also come loose and might wind up separating from rest of the United States was greeted with enthusiasm from most other states.last_img read more

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10 ways to realistically make your first $1 million

first_img 38SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Making $1 million might seem like an impossible goal — but with planning, side gigs, lifestyle tweaks and investing, it’s actually doable. Like any large goal, breaking the steps into manageable pieces can increase your chance of success. See what steps money experts recommend you take to help you make your first $1 million.1. Boost Your Profit MarginA profit margin isn’t strictly reserved for businesses; it also applies to you. “By increasing the gap between what you earn and what you spend, you end up with a profit in exactly the same way a business earns a profit,” said J.D. Roth of personal finance blog MoneyBoss.com. “This profit can then be used to pursue your long-term financial goals.”To specifically reach a million bucks, you’ll need to boost your savings rate substantially more than the normal 5 percent to 15 percent, said Roth. He suggested saving half of your income, and noted that you’ll have to make hard choices of deferring present spending in exchange for future financial success. For two-income families, he suggested choosing to live on one income, and saving and investing the other salary. continue reading »last_img read more

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NYSDOT workers still hard at work despite mild winter

first_imgWhen the temperatures dip and rise within hours, it can cause problems on the roads, such as potholes and cracks. That is when the New York State Department of Transportation steps in to help. “There is a misconception that all DOT does is they just plow roads and, when we have a mild winter like this, people may question, ‘Well what are all you guys doing?’ We have a lot of people out right now plugging potholes before they become a problem,” said Cook. (WBNG) — Though this year’s winter hasn’t created a lot of snow for the NYSDOT to consistently plow, officials say the workers keep busy. NYSDOT spokesperson, Scott Cook, says the department does a whole lot more than plow roadways. In addition, workers there do many road repairs from filling in potholes to fixing guide rails. There are also plenty of trucks and heavy machinery to maintain, which the employees work extra hard on when they have the time to spare on days with better weather. They clean the trucks as well as do safety checks to make sure they are ready for their next challenge. “There’s a lot to do and when we have a mild winter like this, it actually helps us get a jump on the Spring,” said Cook. In the meantime, Cook says it is often easy for drivers to forget NYSDOT workers are still on the roads when the weather is nice. So, he asks for everyone to remain aware and move over whenever you see a vehicle on the side of the road.last_img read more