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What To Do About The Draper Effect

first_imgFacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant Greg Freiherr has reported on developments in radiology since 1983. He runs the consulting service, The Freiherr Group. News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more Auld Lang SyneLong — long — gone are the days when radiologists could return from a trade show and demand of a hospital administrator the purchase of a specific product. Chief technology officers and other chief executive officers (CXOs) today hold that kind of power. But often CXOs turn to those in the trenches of healthcare when making their decisions.Faced with realistic illustrations, administrators might see what is possible under real conditions with specific equipment, compare this to what they know and what they need, and return to report their conclusions to the C suite. Might radiologists do the same, influencing not only purchase decisions but, through their relationships with referring physicians and an appreciation for authentic equipment performance, the exams that are ordered?Admittedly, this might be asking a lot. Draper images are sewn into the fabric of radiology since forever. And they are likely to remain so, especially when high-end systems are shown for the first time. For these new products, which often are tested only selectively, it may be impossible to describe their use in routine conditions, much less obtain images produced under routine conditions.A Draper-less approach to promotion, however, might be applied to other products in a vendor portfolio, ones that have been around for a while. Trade booths are notoriously tight on space and vendors must pick and choose the equipment they bring to a show. Equipment that does make the cut might be excellent candidates for mini-reality shows — panels bearing still and video images, accompanied by text, that illustrate what different types of equipment can do under realistic circumstances, as well as the people who make those images.In the years ahead, practical issues are going to determine what sells. Value medicine will impact how equipment is used.It is all but certain that vendors will continue showing the best images possible, especially to buttress new product launches. But maybe those Draper images could be accompanied by ones made using other equipment, whose performance under everyday conditions can be described and the results shown with images that have real-world value.Authenticity … what a concept. Editor’s note: This is the second blog in a four-part series on patient centricity. The first blog, “Value Medicine: Radiology’s Big Chance,” can be found here. Related Content Image courtesy of Pixabay. Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.center_img Images shown at trade shows tend to be, well … perfect. The kVP is adjusted precisely in computed tomography (CT); the ultrasound probe is set for optimal penetration and clarity; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols are tuned like a Stradivarius. Some of the subjects have to border on anorexia, especially the ones used for ultrasound. And, regardless of the modality or the time needed, the data are processed well beyond the average.And the results show the care taken. They are the radiological expression of what Mad Men fans might call the Don Draper effect — that button-down, crisp white shirt, tie straight and shoes shined to a gloss perfection.In Seinfeldese, the images are spectacular — but not real. And everyone who’s been around a show floor or two knows it. This raises the question of whether the equipment and the modalities they represent are the best choices for routine cases. It’s a question not easily answered. Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Blog | Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant | Radiology Imaging| July 13, 2016 What To Do About The Draper Effect Draper Images and Value MedicineWhat we can say is that Draper images may not work well with value medicine. And that may be a good thing. Nothing undoes a technology or, by extension, a product, like disappointment. And disappointment is sure to happen, if practitioners expect to get these pristine beautiful images when scanning the everyman and everywoman, especially when efficiency and effectiveness are at premiums.Consider the following: Americans tend to be heavier than the subjects whose innards appear in Draper images. Seldom are techs of the same caliber as the ones that produce those near-perfect images. And the time to process them just isn’t there in a busy workday.So how do vendors bridge this rift between the way they have traditionally positioned their products and the coming change in the practice of medicine? It won’t be easy. And, more than likely, Draper images will be around for a long time. But their influence might wane.What could diminish the widespread allure of Draper images at trade shows might be the recognition that practical issues are going to become increasingly important. So, regardless of what companies display at trade shows — regardless of how good the images are on tricked-out machines taking images of ideal subjects with protocols that generate data that are processed to perfection — what will become increasingly important will be what sites can produce under real-life conditions.What an epiphany it would be for booth visitors to be presented with images produced in a routine setting on real patients (images with patient identification appropriately deleted, of course) by personnel who would typically do the scans. Not the best of the best — not specially trained techs who can turn to a vendor-supplied engineer to produce radiological Renoirs. But realistic presentations that might foster credibility by accurately illustrating the capabilities of a piece of equipment, while at the same time demonstrating the pathologies this equipment might be used to visualize. News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 06, 2019 Canon Medical Introduces Encore Orian MR Upgrade Program Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. is helping to provide low-cost patient care solutions for its customers with the launch… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more last_img

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