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Lions Linebacker Trevor Bates arrested in NYC

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailTom Szczerbowski/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Detroit Lions Linebacker Trevor Bates punched a New York City police officer in the face after getting arrested for allegedly not paying a 32 dollar cab fare.The 25-year old was brought to the 115th Precinct in the borough of Queens for processing, but refused to be fingerprinted and allegedly punched the officer who was trying to calm him down.The officer was taken to a hospital and received three stitches. He was also diagnosed with a concussion.He is facing a felony charge of assaulting a police officer as well as resisting arrest and theft of service.“We are aware of the arrest of Trevor Bates earlier today in New York,” Lions general manager Bob Quinn said in a statement. “We have not spoken to Trevor as of yet and are still in the process of gathering more information. The Detroit Lions will have no further comment at this time.”Bates appeared in nine games in his first season with the Lions and made three tackles.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written by Beau Lundcenter_img January 26, 2019 /Sports News – National Lions Linebacker Trevor Bates arrested in NYClast_img read more

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Report: Toronto Raptors to play home games in Tampa for the rest of the season

first_img Written by Because of ongoing border restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic and mindful of public safety measures in Canada, the team has decided they will continue to play their home games in Tampa for the remainder of the 2020-21 season.Details: https://t.co/3n6yp5tjjB pic.twitter.com/gs6kyWDqmu— Toronto Raptors (@Raptors) February 11, 2021The team had originally planned to play their home games for the first half of the season at the Amalie Arena, which they share with the defending Stanley Cup champions, the Tampa Bay Lightning. The Raptors are currently 6-5 in “home” games.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailVadim ZHakupov/iStockBy ABC News(NEW YORK) — The Toronto Raptors will continue to play their home games at the Amalie Arena in Tampa, Florida for the rest of the 2020-21 NBA season, accoriding to an ESPN report. In a statement posted to the team’s website, the team said they would remain in Tampa due to ongoing border restrictions brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.“Florida has been really welcoming to us and we’re so grateful for the hospitality we’ve found in Tampa and at Amalie – we’re living in a city of champions, and we intend to carry on the tradition of winning for our new friends and fans here,” Raptors President Masai Ujiri said in the statement. “But home is where the heart is, and our hearts are in Toronto. We think often of our fans, of our Scotiabank Arena family, and all those we are missing back home, and we can’t wait until we can all be together again.” February 11, 2021 /Sports News – National Report: Toronto Raptors to play home games in Tampa for the rest of the season Beau Lundlast_img read more

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Business transfer

first_imgPreparing your business for a saleIn an ideal world, you should start preparing your business for sale at least 18 months before you put it onto the market. Some simple changes can have a dramatic impact on the sale price that you achieve.For example, the profit that you declare during your last financial year will be a very important factor in determining the sale price. This can be increased by postponing capital expenditure, cutting costs and asking your accountant to prepare the audited accounts in a less tax-efficient way than usual.With a letting business, most buyers will pay more for recurring income than for one-off income. Consequently, persuading your landlords to switch from let-only contracts to management or rent collection contracts can have a significant impact on the price.Another thing that you might consider is transferring your lettings business into a separate limited company. This gives you the option to sell the lettings book and the sales business to different buyers and still qualify for the ten per cent entrepreneurs’ tax rate. However, under HMRC rules, this must be done at least 12 months before the sale.Finally, you need to check that your compliance is 100 per cent perfect. Missing documents, such as gas safety certificates, HMO licences, tenancy agreements or landlords’ signed terms and conditions, can spook a buyer and cost you a sale. This is so important that you might even consider getting an independent compliance expert in to conduct a formal audit of your business.Be sure that your compliance is 100% perfect. Any missing documents can spook a buyer.Getting the best priceThe best price is not the highest headline price. It is the net proceeds after tax and disposal costs. This can be very confusing for sellers.For example, a lot of businesses are worth much more for break-up than they are as a going concern. In such cases, the obvious thing to do would be to offer the lettings book to a direct competitor who is already operating in the area. However, once you factor in the cost of disposing of the premises and making the staff redundant, it might be actually better to sell the business for a lower price as a going concern. Another factor to consider here is the risk of letting a direct competitor knows that you are selling.One other important factor to consider is tax. Most buyers will want to buy the assets of your business, not the limited company as this is usually more tax-efficient for them. It will also reduce the transaction costs for bothsides. However, you will pay a much higher rate of tax on an asset sale. You therefore need to do your sums very carefully before deciding which the best option is.Once you have decided whether to offer the business for sale as a whole or in parts and whether to offer the shares or the assets, you need to set a realistic guide price. Just as when selling a house, if you overcook it, you run the risk of having to go back to prospective buyers later at a reduced price and this will put you at a great disadvantage.I usually value a business using three different formulae; a percentage of the turnover, a percentage of the profit and the asset value. In addition to ensuring that the price is right, this process also tells me whether the business is best offered for break-up or as a going concern.Finally, you need to decide how many prospective buyers to approach though occasionally the best price is achieved by offering the business to one carefully targeted buyer at a premium price. But in the vast majority of cases, the way to achieve the best price is to invite a number of buyers to compete to buy the business.ConfidentialityIf word gets out that a business is being sold, it can do the most enormous harm. Your staff will be unsettled and may leave and your competitors may start approaching your landlords and vendors. For this reason, estate agency businesses should never be advertised openly for sale and all interested parties must be carefully screened and asked to sign a non-disclosure agreement before they even find out the areas in which you operate.Your last declared profit will be an important factor in determining the sale price of your business.Buying a businessLetting businesses are usually valued on turnover and sell for much higher prices than sales businesses. The reason for this is that lettings income is much more stable and predictable. The prices of letting businesses vary hugely but generally speaking you get what you pay for. Cheap businesses might deal with most of their landlords on a let-only basis, might have a high percentage of housing benefit tenancies or might have compliance problems.Good quality managed businesses might seem expensive but the test is whether you could acquire the same level of turnover more cheaply by building a business from scratch. Most firms cannot which is why good businesses sell for such high prices.The value of a residential sales business is much harder to determine. It will depend on the time that the business has been established, its reputation, the quality of the staff and the consistency of the profits that have been generated over many years. As a rule of thumb guide, a sales business will sell for 30 to 50 per cent of the value of a lettings business with the same turnover.ComplianceIf I could give just one word of advice to business buyers, that word would be “compliance”. When you buy a business, you take on responsibility for all its liabilities and a badly run business could very easily have hidden liabilities that exceed its purchase price several times over. It is therefore absolutely essential to employ a solicitor, an accountant and a compliance expert with specialist knowledge of the property sector to ensure that you are not caught out.Adam Walker is a management consultant and business transfer agent who has specialised in the property sector for 25 years. www.adamjwalker.co.uk June 2, 2014The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Business transfer previous nextBusiness transferProperty Drum2nd June 20140537 Viewslast_img read more

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PREPARING FOR THANKSGIVING

first_img× PREPARING FOR THANKSGIVING — The annual Bayonne Interfaith Thanksgiving Service will be held on November 19 at St Vincent de Paul Church, 979 Avenue C at 7 p.m.  Planning for this event are Fr. George Greiss, Shivaughn Lachish, Rev. Dorothy Patterson, Deacon Michael Missaggia, Bishop Gregory Cook Sr., Rev. Gary Grindeland and Fr. John Fencik. All are welcome to attend.last_img

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More Like Spring As We Move Into The Weekend

first_imgA return to spring time conditions as we move into the weekend as high pressure will move offshore and pump milder air into the region.Friday will feature the most sunshine of the next several days. A warm front will move through, however, it will switch winds to our south. For us, it means a breezy, cool day as winds come onshore from chilly ocean waters. Highs should fall short of 50 degrees.Forecast Highs FridaySaturday will be the “warmest” day although there will be a good deal of clouds. Southwest winds will allow temperatures to climb into the mid to upper 60s inland and around 60 along the coast.Forecast Highs SaturdayA backdoor front will slide down for Sunday and easterly winds will kick in dropping our temperatures into the 40s. The frontal system will stall over our area and a series of low pressure systems will move through giving us several rounds of showers Sunday through Tuesday. Computer models several shots of rain Sunday through Tuesday. Although it won’t be raining the whole time, it will remain on the cloudy side with temperatures in the 50s.(Courtesy:tropicaltibits.com)Drier and seasonable conditions return by Wednesday of next week and long range outlook into April shows not more chilly blasts but no warm spells either. Temperatures should remain mainly in the 50s through at least the first week of April.NOAA: Temperature outlook keep the Northeast seasonable with above normal temperatures in the Central and Southern U.S.last_img read more

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Premier Foods on profit target

first_imgPremier Foods looks set to meet its full year profit expectations despite a difficult economic and trading environment. Sales for the Baking & Milling division are approximately 16% ahead year on year for the first half, mainly driven by price increases across its bread and flour range. The company’s trading update also highlighted an increase in group sales by 7% and Hovis’ rejuvenation.The update for the half year ending 28 June 2008 also revealed the group trading profit is in line with the first half of 2007, due to the achievement of price rises to recover cost inflation. Premier Foods’ unaudited net debt stands at £1.82 bn, “reflecting the seasonality of the business”. However it expects net debt to fall over the second half.“The integration of Campbell’s and RHM is proceeding ahead of its original schedule,” said chief executive, Robert Schofield. “Our manufacturing rationalisation programme is progressing well with the closure of the Bristol and Droylsden factories in June. We have now closed five out of the nine factories scheduled to close through this programme with the remaining four to close over the second half of the year.” Premier Foods also made efforts to safeguard against rising commodity prices. “We have good forward sight of inflationary pressures and have plans in place to mitigate them as they occur,” added Schofield. “Our expectations for the year remain unchanged with progress weighted to the second half as the benefits of synergies from the manufacturing rationalisation programme, price increases achieved to date and the rejuvenation of Hovis flow through.”last_img read more

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Watch Dead & Company Play ‘Easy Wind’ and ‘Misty’ At West Coast Soundchecks

first_imgThe road never ends for jam-giants Dead & Company. Last weekend, the Grateful Dead offshoot stopped in Portland, OR and at The Gorge Amphitheatre in Washington State for two nights of Dead-inspired jams. It was an excellent weekend in the Pacific Northwest, with great music all around!The videos below show two songs from different soundchecks. First up is a rough take on the Workingman’s Dead track “Easy Wind”, which the band would play for the first time in front of an audience that night in Portland. They refer to the original recording of the song at one point, quickly learning the changes so they could get the song just right for its performance that evening.Next, the band takes an impromptu test-run of Erroll Garner‘ 1954 jazz standard “Misty”, which Bob Weir used to perform with his late partner-in-crime Rob Wasserman. The beautiful song fits perfectly with the serene setting of The Gorge.It’s hard to deny that Dead & Company are having tons of fun on the road. With nightly dips into the Grateful Dead catalog of rarities, the musicians have endless material to entertain themselves with and to keep fans on the edge of their seats. Dead & Company wrap up their summer tour this week with four shows in California, hitting Irvine, Chula Vista, Wheatland, and a tour-closing performance at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, CA.[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

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From taking notes in the classroom to helping the front lines

first_img Center for Ethics launches COVID-19 Rapid Response Impact Initiative Related Extracurriculars for an online campus With classes in cyberspace, why not Socialize Remotely? If Harvard were to reopen today, who should be allowed to return? Fagan says the students have handled the pressure of the situation with aplomb. “I’ve been on calls on the weekends with students and their host clients working on these issues. Morning, afternoon, evening,” he said. “They’ve definitely taken it on.”Kapadia hopes that the COVID-19 crisis forces U.S. officials to take public service supply chains much more seriously.“Over 5 million manufacturing jobs have been exported out of the United States over the last 20 years,” he said. “That’s a result of making ‘low cost’ the primary value-driver in our supply chains. Professor Fagan’s class has given us the tools to incorporate other values — public values — into supply chains.” When Mark Fagan, lecturer at Harvard Kennedy School, was putting together his spring course “Supply Chain Management for Public Service Delivery,” he was not expecting that he would be teaching against the backdrop of a global pandemic.Fagan’s pedagogy usually emphasizes experiential learning; because of time constraints, this course would have to rely on in-class discussions with public service professionals via Skype. The final project was going to be a 2000-word paper, rather than a deliverable to a local municipality or nonprofit organization, as is typical in Fagan’s classes.But by early March, the COVID-19 pandemic was exploding in the United States. Cities were shutting down, workers were staying home or being laid off, and American hospitals were beginning to see the kinds of caseloads that their counterparts in China, Italy, and Iran had experienced weeks earlier. The focus of the course began to shift out of necessity; how could a class on supply chain management (SCM), one of the fundamental aspects of how governments deliver services to citizens, not address the most acute public health crisis since polio in the 1950s? Then in mid-March, Fagan got an email from the chief of internal medicine at a local hospital.“She has been a client of mine in operations management for five or six years and we’ve had a wonderful collaboration,” Fagan recalls. “[She said,] ‘What’s going on at the hospital right now is an amazing set of challenges in terms of operations. It would be great if we could find some ways to document and learn from it.’”“And I responded back with, ‘Well that’s one option, but I think I have one that may be even more effective,’” Fagan said.The problem the hospital was dealing with was scheduling during its response to the pandemic. Hospital administrators needed a tool that would help coordinate the schedules of 300 medical professionals and provide advanced analytics to optimize assignments. The hospital needed a dynamic way to assign individual doctors or nurses to wards based on experience, capabilities, work hours, and other restrictions.Calling in the troopsFagan reached out to students in his SCM course to gauge their interest in working on the project but wasn’t sure what kind of response he would get. It was spring break, many students had left campus, and Fagan wasn’t sure how receptive they would be to working on a project during their time off. But the students’ response was emphatically positive.“About 10 people responded back and said, ‘We’re on.’ They spent much of spring break working on it and then a subset of them kept going and made it their full project,” Fagan says. Not only did Fagan’s students come through, but a handful of HKS students who were not enrolled in the course volunteered to help on the project.“I learned about the project from a friend in Professor Fagan’s class,” said Sam Gilman, M.P.P./J.D. ’22. “When she described the challenge the hospital was facing, I realized that my experience building dashboards [at another institution] would translate directly to helping the hospital. I saw an opportunity to help support the hospital and knew I could find other students with complementary skill sets to join the team.”The team developed the dynamic scheduling tool that the hospital needed, and by early April it had been delivered for testing and implementation by medical staff.Pivoting to new problemsThe students’ response inspired Fagan to set up more projects as part of the course. He reached out to his contacts in municipal government and the health care industry to see if any needed assistance in addressing the COVID-19 pandemic. Within days he was able to set up projects with several host organizations.The common thread running through each of these projects is the supply chain. Governments must figure out how to move services, equipment, and necessities from suppliers to end-users — in this case, constituents. The ongoing controversy surrounding shortages of personal protective equipment for health care providers dealing with COVID-19 is just one example of the ways that reliable and resilient supply chains are crucial to the delivery of public services.At the hospital hosting the scheduling project, another group in Fagan’s class is developing a plan for a telemedicine service, which could be valuable in promoting social distancing and reducing the number of people who must come to the facility in person. The group is trying to answer fundamental questions about the role such a service would play in a hospital, and the logistics for implementing it.Another project involves a major blood donation center that needed to develop a blood plasma collection program. Normally, such organizations already have supply chains in place for identifying and bringing in donors. But COVID-19 presents a unique challenge. The center must find plasma donors who have had COVID-19, recovered, and no longer test positive. Such donors are unlikely to have donated plasma before and are more difficult to find. To address this challenge, students in Fagan’s class are developing a program that will help the organization identify recovered COVID-19 patients, obtain plasma donations, and distribute these donations to processing centers.A unique experience in experiential learningFor the students, the complexity of the problems, and the unpredictable nature of the crisis, generated challenges that would be difficult to recreate in a classroom environment.“We’re navigating through imperfect and uncertain information,” said Zul Kapadia, M.P.A. ’21. “Like many professionals understand, real life isn’t a perfectly balanced case study or simulation. We have to struggle with what we’re given and create value.” Keeping ethics alive during the pandemic Michael Sandel poses a series of questions at a community event on ethics and the pandemic response last_img read more

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Students look forward to attending College GameDay taping before taking on Miami

first_imgESPN’s “College GameDay” will be in Coral Gables, Florida, for No. 3 Notre Dame’s game against No. 7 Miami on Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon.Senior David Hessert, who will be attending the game, said College GameDay is known to cover games featuring teams with “storied rivalries, where there are implications for both teams’ success.” Rosie LoVoi | The Observer Senior and Notre Dame leprechaun Joe Fennessy entertains the crowd during Notre Dame’s 48-37 victory over Wake Forest.Hessert said he believes the broadcast is sure to draw national attention for the game.“College GameDay tends to heighten the anticipation around the game and creates a really fun atmosphere for fans,” he said.Hessert said he had attended a game covered by College GameDay once before — the Notre Dame-South Carolina game in 2005.The atmosphere of the game “was absolutely electric,” Hessert said.“You could just feel the excitement in the air,” he said.Senior Morgan Dunn, who is also attending the game, said she is particularly excited for Saturday because of the historic rivalry between Notre Dame and Miami. The rivalry stems largely from a 1988 game in which Notre Dame defeated Miami 31-30, Dunn said.As for game day predictions, Dunn said she believes the Irish will win by two touchdowns.“Their defense is pretty good,” Dunn said. “But our offense will overtake them.”Despite the fact that Miami remains undefeated this season, Hessert said he also predicts a Notre Dame victory.“[Miami] really hasn’t had a formidable opponent yet,” Hessert said. “Notre Dame will be their true test.”The outcome of the game is likely to depend on Notre Dame’s rushing offense, Hessert said.“If our offensive line can make a bit of a push, we should be able to win,” he said.Senior Joe Fennessy, who serves as the Notre Dame Leprechaun for football games, will also be in Florida for the game this weekend.As the Leprechaun, Fennessy said his main job will be rallying support for the Irish and interacting with fans before and during the game.After making an appearance at a pep rally hosted by the Notre Dame Club of Miami on Friday night, Fennessy said he will arrive on set for the College GameDay broadcast by 8 a.m. on Saturday.Fennessy said he expects Saturday’s program to cover “anything from short segments on players and coaches to in-depth reviews of different teams.”Fennessy said he is particularly excited for the prediction segment at the end of the broadcast. Lee Corso, one of the show’s four hosts, concludes each program by donning the mascot headgear of the team he predicts to win, Fennessy said.Fennessy said he hopes for a vote for Notre Dame, and is confident in the team’s ability to return to South Bend with a victory.“Of course I think the Irish are going to win,” Fennessy said. “They’ve been working hard. The team’s getting better every week.”Tags: college gameday, football, Football Friday Featurelast_img read more