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No savings at 50? I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks to boost a passive income in retirement

first_imgSimply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Peter Stephens | Monday, 3rd February, 2020 | More on: TSCO ULVR No savings at 50? I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks to boost a passive income in retirement I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Peter Stephens owns shares of Tesco and Unilever. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Unilever. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge!center_img Enter Your Email Address Buying FTSE 100 shares with high dividend yields is not the only means of improving your long-term income prospects. In fact, purchasing stocks that have lower yields but relatively strong dividend growth prospects could be a sound move. In time, they could offer a higher and faster growing passive income.With that in mind, here are two companies that could deliver a brisk rise in their shareholder payouts. They could improve your retirement income prospects – even if you are beginning your retirement plans from a standing start at age 50.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…TescoTesco (LSE: TSCO) may not seem to be a worthwhile income share for the long term. After all, consumer confidence is weak and there is a tremendous amount of competition in the supermarket sector.However, the company’s strategy has contributed to a significant improvement in its financial performance that is expected to continue over the long run. For example, the business has been able to cut costs, improve customer satisfaction scores and expand into faster growing areas such as convenience and online. This is expected to deliver a rise in the company’s bottom line of 23% in the current year, with a further 8% growth forecast for next year.A rising bottom line means that Tesco could deliver an improving dividend. In fact, over the next three years its shareholder payouts are due to rise at an annualised rate of 20%. This puts it on a forward yield of around 4% next year from a payout which is due to be covered twice by net profit.Therefore, while there are higher-yielding shares in the FTSE 100 than Tesco at the present time, the company’s long-term income growth prospects could make it an attractive investment opportunity.UnileverUnilever’s (LSE: ULVR) recent fourth-quarter update highlighted the challenging operating conditions experienced by the consumer goods company in recent months. They contributed to the company missing its previous sales guidance for the full year, although it continued to experience relatively strong growth in emerging markets.Looking ahead, Unilever is aiming to ramp-up its cost saving initiatives and become increasingly innovative. This could catalyse its financial prospects, and may strengthen its long-term performance.Since the company’s share price has fallen in recent months, it now has a dividend yield of 3.4%. This is relatively attractive compared to its past levels, and suggests that the stock offers fair value for money. Moreover, with its bottom line forecast to rise by 8% in the current year and by 7% next year, it has a solid financial outlook which may lead to a rising dividend.Beyond next year, the company’s strong position in emerging markets and its range of dominant consumer brands may mean that it is able to report rising dividends over the long run that make Unilever a highly appealing income share. Image source: Getty Images See all posts by Peter Stephens Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool.last_img read more

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My passive income list right now would have these 2 ideas on it

first_img Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. My passive income list right now would have these 2 ideas on it Coming up with ways to earn money without working doesn’t have to be hard. A passive income list can contain simple, practical ideas that are immediately actionable.A key part of my approach to passive income is putting away spare money in a Stocks and Shares ISA, then investing it in income generating shares. Sometimes shares which generate income can cut or cancel their dividends. That would impact my passive income. That’s why I always try to have more than one stock idea on my passive income list.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…The link between free cash flow and passive incomeLooking at earnings can tell a lot about a company’s financial success. However, earnings are an accounting measure. Free cash flow is the surplus money the company generates. That matters when looking at passive income ideas, as paying out juicy dividends for many years requires the right level of free cash flow.That’s why one of my passive income ideas is Imperial Brands (LSE: IMB). I already own it, but would consider buying more at the current price. The owner of brands such as John Player Special and Lambert & Butler is a cash generation machine. However, its policy of growing dividends by 10% each year meant that dividend coverage from free cash flow slipped. While the difference between earnings and free cash flow may seem academic, that illustrates why it’s worth understanding it when looking for passive income ideas.The upshot was that Imperial cut its dividend by a third. So, you may wonder, why is it still on my passive income list? The City has apparently cooled on Imperial, which means its share price has fallen compared to recent years. At its current price, the shares yield 9.9%. That means that, for every £100 I put into Imperial, I would expect £99 in passive income each year. If the company raises the dividend, that could increase. Dividends aren’t guaranteed and as tobacco consumption is falling in many markets, free cash flows could be affected down the line.Basing my passive income list on what I knowI don’t think passive income should require a lot of work. That is why it is called passive, after all.So that influences me to stick to my circle of competence when assessing passive income ideas. Instead of trying to understand industries or companies I don’t know, I often start by thinking about companies which seem to be well-regarded by my social circle. Then I look into whether they are listed.Sometimes, well-known, well-run companies are already fully priced by the market. But not always.Consider Direct Line for example. The insurer is a household name with an iconic brand. Yet these FTSE 250 shares come with a 7% yield. That makes it worth considering for me as a passive income idea.Insurance can be cyclical, though, which can negatively impact pricing. That could affect the dividend, and indeed last year it cancelled its final dividend amid the pandemic, although it did later pay a special dividend. I also find it discouraging that over the past year, directors have sold but not bought shares with their own money. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Image source: Getty Image christopherruane owns shares of Imperial Brands. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Imperial Brands. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Enter Your Email Addresscenter_img Christopher Ruane | Friday, 12th March, 2021 | More on: IMB Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks?If so, get this FREE no-strings report now.While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead.And the performance of this company really is stunning.In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends.We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen.Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31%In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!)Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick.What’s more, it deserves your attention today.So please don’t wait another moment. See all posts by Christopher Ruane FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shareslast_img read more

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Tom Shanklin’s Career Highlights

first_imgThe other was stitching Xavier Rush up on a blind date and videoing him – that was my masterplan. He gave a girl his number and then we got a friend he didn’t know to text him pretending to be the girl and arranging to meet up. We interviewed him about the date and filmed him getting ready, showering, shaving and so on. Then we went to the bar where they were meeting, sat upstairs and filmed him sitting downstairs with a bottle of wine and two glasses! That was pretty good – but I’m watching over my shoulder in case he tries to get me back.Find out what Tom Shanklin’s next career move is – and how he would shake up the game – in the July issue of Rugby World, on sale Tuesday 7 June. Get in: Peel and Jones in happier times pre-sheep LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Best friend…There’s so many. I really enjoyed the era with Wales from 2003 to 2005. That’s where we grew up as a squad. They’re the ones who understand where we’d come from and where we’d got to.Worst room-mate…There have been a few. Gethin Jenkins always wants everyone to leave his room and he snores badly. They’ve combated that by giving him his own room.Get in! Peel and Jones in happier times pre-sheepBest practical joke…There’s been loads – I’ll pick two. The first is Mark Jones putting a sheep in Dwayne Peel’s room at the 2007 World Cup. Mark’s very good with animals having grown up on a farm so he managed to get the sheep in there, then it did its business everywhere! Last hurrah: Shanklin makes a break against New Zealand in his final Wales Test in November 2010TOM SHANKLIN’S rugby-playing days were brought to an end in April when he was forced to retire because of a knee injury. The centre’s club career took in London Welsh, Saracens and Cardiff Blues, where he spent eight years, while he also followed his father, Jim, in donning a Wales jersey. During his ten-year international career he won 70 caps and scored 20 tries for Wales, and was also selected for two Lions tours, though injury curtailed his involvement in 2005 and ruled him out before the squad even travelled to South Africa four years later.As he embarks on life outside of rugby, we asked Shanklin to look back on his career and pick out a few highlights.Half century: in action during his 50th TestBest memory… Winning my 50th cap and walking out first (against Italy at the Millennium Stadium in February 2008)Best game… The 2005 Grand Slam win over Ireland – it was just so long since Wales had won one. The way we won the whole tournament, the way the day went, the crowd – everything was great.Worst game… Fiji at the 2007 World Cup. It was gutting to be knocked out of the tournament. Also being part of  the run of ten straight losing games before the 2003 World Cup – and playing in most of them.Best team-mate… I’ve played with so many centres. At the start of my career Tim Horan (Saracens) was a massive influence. I learnt a lot playing with him and I still keep in contact with him. I really enjoyed playing with Jamie Robinson at Cardiff Blues, and alongside Gareth Thomas too.last_img read more

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4n House / ninkipen!

first_img Structural Engineer: Projects ArchDaily 2013 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/482638/4n-house-ninkipen Clipboard Houses “COPY” 2013 Japan Photographs Architects: ninkipen! Area Area of this architecture project Area:  118 m² Area:  118 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: center_img TAPS, Masaichi Taguchi CopyHouses•Ikoma, Japan Year:  4n House / ninkipen! photographs:  Hiroki KawataPhotographs:  Hiroki Kawata ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/482638/4n-house-ninkipen Clipboard 4n House / ninkipen!Save this projectSave4n House / ninkipen! Constractor:Kimura KoumutenArchitect In Charge:Yasuo ImazuCity:IkomaCountry:JapanMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Hiroki KawataRecommended ProductsWindowsAir-LuxSliding Window – CurvedWindowsVEKAWindows – SOFTLINE 82 ADWindowsJansenWindows – Janisol PrimoGlassSolarluxGlass Canopy – SDL AcubisText description provided by the architects. This is a house for a family of four in Ikoma city.Save this picture!SectionThe site had been divided into two levels with a retaining wall, and vehicle access was to the lower level only. We removed the wall, connecting the two levels with a gentle slope, and floated the house above it.Save this picture!© Hiroki KawataBy elevating the house on piloti we created good views and an all weather outdoor space which is also a children’s playground and the entrance porch.Save this picture!© Hiroki KawataThe window rail on the second floor is cantilevered to allow wind flow inside.Save this picture!© Hiroki KawataThe kitchen counter is a thin concrete slab on a timber frame and maybe it is suitable to call it just a flower stand.Save this picture!Third Floor PlanThe third floor is a cramped but has free flowing atmosphere like an attic.Save this picture!© Hiroki KawataChildren are running around these three floors now.Save this picture!© Hiroki KawataWe hope that this family of four can have a house for their family in the wake of the 3.11 earthquake and live comfortably in their own way. Project gallerySee allShow lessCalatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub Fails to ImpressArchitecture NewsAD Interviews: Antón García-Abril / Ensamble StudioInterviews Share Save this picture!© Hiroki Kawata+ 23 Share “COPY” CopyAbout this officeninkipen!OfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesIkomaHousesJapanPublished on March 08, 2014Cite: “4n House / ninkipen!” 08 Mar 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassCompositesMitrexPhotovoltaic Solar Cladding – BIPV CladdingPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodPanel Façade SystemArmchairsUniForArmchair – ParigiLouvers / ShuttersBruagShading Screens – Perforated Facade PanelsAluminium CompositesSculptformAluminium Façade BladesCultural / PatrimonialIsland Exterior FabricatorsSeptember 11th Memorial Museum Envelope SystemWire MeshJakobWebnet in a Gymnasium in GurmelsDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Pocket Door | MareaPaintKEIMMineral Paint for Concrete – KEIM Concretal®-WLouversReynaers AluminiumSolar ShadingHandlesFormaniFitting Collection – ARCMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Home Office grants £8.3 million to boost smaller firms’ payroll giving

first_imgHome Office Minister Fiona Mactaggart said: “Payroll giving is not just something that big organisations can do – 12.6 million employees work for small and medium sized businesses and there is a real need for their employers to get on board. I hope that this innovative new scheme – through which the Government will double employees’ donations by up to £10 per month – will be embraced by smaller businesses.”The scheme is to be promoted as part of the 2005 Year of the Volunteer, an initiative which will encourage more people to give their time, talents and money to the voluntary sector.Treasury Minister John Healey MP added: “Evidence shows that just 1 in 5 employees have access to a payroll giving scheme. By providing a financial incentive to employers to set up schemes, I hope that we can increase this number so that more employees have the opportunity to give tax effectively through the payroll.”The grant will consist of two parts: a tiered financial incentive to employers who implement and promote a new scheme that will be dependent on the size of the SME; and a matched gift, up to £10 per month up to six months from when an employee signs up, from the Government in addition to each new payroll giving donation.The scheme will be formally launched early in 2005. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 27 November 2004 | News Home Office grants £8.3 million to boost smaller firms’ payroll giving  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis As announced by the Chancellor in the 2004 Budget, the Home Office is to grant £8.3 million to encourage smaller firms to set up payroll giving schemes and to encourage employees to make regular payroll gifts to charity.The grant will be administered by the Institute of Fundraising and promoted by Business in the Community. Small and medium sized enterprises will receive a one-off grant of up to £500 depending on their size, as an incentive to set up a payroll giving scheme. In addition, the Government will match pound for pound, up to a maximum of £10 per month, an employee’s donation for six months from when the employee signs up.The Institute of Fundraising will be responsible for supporting charities as they develop new relationships with SMEs. It will provide regular training opportunities for charities throughout the nations and regions of the UK, supported by marketing materials, information resources and access to advice. Business in the Community will be responsible for promoting the scheme to small and medium enterprises through small business networks. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Rasmea Odeh’s International Working Women’s Day message

first_imgRasmea OdehExcerpts from a statement issued on March 8, four days before Odeh’s conviction in Detroit.  I’m so grateful for the support, care, and endless love you have shown me, and for so much of the time and effort you have dedicated to the case since my arrest in October 2013. Your support gives me important strength, and continues to allow me the resilience to achieve justice.I want to tell you that your activism and creative support changed the negative reaction against me, especially when I was in the detention center. Your intensive phone calls and demonstrations, and the support letters that I received from you, played a great role in breaking the isolation and providing a warm feeling in my heart and mind in the freezing cell. With your support, I was able to face all of the challenges and difficulties that threatened my life and my morale!You are all coming together today to celebrate International Women’s Day, to support me and my legal team, and to stand up for justice. Justice is not a gift or handout that we wait for someone to give to us! Justice is a human right that must be fought for and won. The way women all over the world are fighting for their rights and the rights of their people. I especially want to recognize the dozens of Palestinian women who are political prisoners in Israeli jails. I lived that for 10 years, and I know how difficult it is. They need your support and your solidarity. Together we will achieve justice and freedom and make positive change and a better future for our communities all over the country and the world.Challenges are not frightening, as long as we believe in our rights and the principles that we stand for, have confidence in ourselves, and rise up together. We become stronger and more effective. Then we can achieve miracles.When I was incarcerated, I learned from my attorneys that people and families in Illinois and other states pledged their businesses and properties to get me released on bail. When the government refused this and asked for cash, a special one of you donated his life savings to get me released. All this incredible support from my closest friends is extremely appreciated! You are helping me to stand up strongly, whether during the incarceration as I defeated the sealed and frozen cell, or as I continue to fight for my freedom with my brilliant legal team.Unite against racismWe all need to continue to work hard to eliminate the disease of racism and national oppression against Palestinians, Arabs, Muslims, Black people, Latinos/as, and other people of color in this country.On a daily basis, we watch the hate crimes that kill innocent people, just like those three beautiful Arab-American, Muslim young people in North Carolina. Or the institutional police violence that killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Eric Garner in New York, and so many other mostly Black men in the U.S. These tragedies and others reflect the extreme hate that some in this country have for Arabs, Muslims, African Americans, and others. The hate is not just from individuals, though. It is encouraged and supported in many political and media circles that we know are sometimes responsible for the way our communities are treated! They make us out into criminals to support their political agendas, so we should recognize this, and unite to resist it.We all stand for social justice and liberation in this country the same way my people have dedicated their lives to the liberation of Palestine.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Groups Raise Questions About Sonny Perdue

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Groups Raise Questions About Sonny Perdue Groups Raise Questions About Sonny Perdue By Hoosier Ag Today – Mar 9, 2017 SHARE Facebook Twitter SHARE Former Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue is still waiting for a nomination hearing before the Senate as the presumptive Secretary of Agriculture. While he waits, Perdue has come under scrutiny this week from certain groups regarding his time as governor. A New York Times article this week includes complaints about Perdue signing legislation that would save him $100,000 in taxes as well as questions about Perdue getting nearly $300,000 in farm subsidies. The Times article chronicles some of the 13 complaints filed against Perdue before the Georgia State Board of Ethics. The article does note that Perdue has his defenders. American Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall is a fellow Georgian who says, “I don’t think you’re going to find a man any more ethical than Sonny Perdue. He is as ethical as it comes.” However, the Environmental Working Group raised questions about Perdue this week about farm subsidies and his many business connections.The Group says Perdue received $278,000 between 1996 and 2004 when he was simultaneously running three businesses and serving as a state senator. They say there is “scant evidence he was actively engaged in farming, which is a requirement for receiving subsidies.”Source: NAFB News Service Previous articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for March 10, 2017Next articleAvian lnfluenza Hits Tennessee Flock Hoosier Ag Today Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Questions raised about press freedom in Turkey on eve of Erdogan visit to France

first_img TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit Organisation Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders has drawn attention to the continuing problems for press freedom in Turkey on the eve of a visit to Paris by Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on 20 October.”The undeniable legislative progress achieved in Turkey must not to mask the fact that it is still very difficult for the most critical journalists to function,” the organisation said.”The press is exposed to misuse of authority by the courts, which in practice continue to impose prison sentences and exorbitant fines that push journalists to censor themselves extensively on the must sensitive subjects such as the army and the Kurdish question,” Reporters Without Borders said.The TV and radio stations are still subject to “brazen censorship” by the High Council for Broadcasting (RTÜK), while pro-Kurdish journalists continue to be the target of many kinds of pressure, the organisation continued.”Despite the progress towards European standards, the gap between the declarations of good intentions and the reality is still considerable, with the result that Turkey still does not fulfil all the necessary conditions for real press freedom,” Reporters Without Borders added.The legislative amendments undertaken by Turkey with a view to joining the European Union have been positive for journalists. Heavy fines have replaced prison sentences in the new press law, adopted in June. The most repressive sanctions, such as the closure of news organisations or bans on printing and distribution, have been eliminated, while the protection of sources has even been reinforced.Journalists being prosecuted for “complicity with terrorist organisations” were acquitted after the anti-terrorism law and criminal code were amended in 2003. But the new version of the criminal code, which will take effect next April, makes “propaganda on behalf of an illegal organisation or its objectives” punishable by one to three years in prison, or even more if the crime is committed by means of the press.Article 159, which has led to many journalists being prosecuted for “affront to the state and state institutions and threats to the indivisible unity of the Turkish Republic,” was amended in 2002 and 2003, with the prison sentence being cut from one year to six months. At the same time, criticism not intentionally aimed at “ridiculing” or “insulting” state institutions is not longer punishable by imprisonment. A further improvement in the new criminal code is the elimination of the crime of “mocking and insulting government ministers.”Nonetheless, contrary to European standards, the new criminal code stipulates that insult is punishable by three months to three years in prison, with the sentence increasing if the crime is committed by means of the press (article 127).In practice, judges still interpret the concept of “criticism” very subjectively and abusive prosecutions continue.Four journalists with the pro-Kurdish daily Yeniden Özgür Gündem who criticised government policy on the Iraq war were brought before the courts in 2003 while online journalist Erol Öskoray was detained for “mocking” and “insulting” the army. Sabri Ejder Öziç, the manager of Radyo Dünya, a local radio station in the southern city of Adana, was sentenced to a year in prison for offending parliament.Hakan Albayrak, a former editorialist for the daily Milli Gazete, was imprisoned on 20 May and is serving a 15-month prison sentence for “attacking the memory of Ataturk” in violation of the 1951 law governing crimes against Kemal Ataturk. Article 1 of this law punishes any offence against the Republic of Turkey’s founder by one to three years in prison. Article 2 doubles the sentence if the crime is committed by means of the press.Nureddin Sirin, the editorialist of the Islamist weekly Selam, and Memik Horuz, the managing editor of the far-left newspaper Isçi Köylü, have spent years in prison for the views they expressed in the course of their journalistic work.Three days ago, on 15 October, Sebati Karakurt of the daily Hurriyet was held for 12 hours at the headquarters of the anti-terrorist police in Istanbul and some 10 policemen searched his home because of a report published a few days earlier that included an interview with Murat Karayilan, the military chief of the former Kurdish Workers’ Party (PKK), now renamed Kongra-Gel. The report included photos showing female rebels in combat fatigues in a favourable light, relaxed and smiling. Karakurt was released after being interrogated by the police and a prosecutor.Furthermore, while the national radio and TV stations are now allowed to using the Kurdish language, the RTÜK continues to impose disproportionate sanctions – ranging from warnings to withdrawal of licence – on pro-Kurdish media or media that are very critical of the government.Özgür Radyo, a local radio station in Istanbul, was sentenced by the RTÜK to a month’s closure for “inciting violence, terror, discrimination on the basis of race, region, language, religion or sect or the broadcasting of programmes that arouse feelings of hate in society.” The station stopped broadcasting on 18 August. In the event of a further offence, the RTÜK could withdraw its licence altogether.Günes TV, a local television station in the eastern city of Malatya, was also forced to stop broadcasting for a month beginning 30 March after the RTÜK accused it of “attacking the state’s existence and independence, and the country’s indivisible unity with the people and Ataturk’s principles and reforms” under article 4 of RTÜK law 3984. Using the same article, the RTÜK closed down local TV station ART in the south-eastern city of Diyarbakir on 15 August 2003 for broadcasting two love songs in Kurdish.The massive detentions of pro-Kurdish journalists by the anti-terrorist police on the eve of the NATO summit in Istanbul on 28-29 June 2004 were also indicative of the treatment reserved for the pro-Kurdish press.Finally, nine journalists covering the dispersal of a protest against electoral fraud were badly beaten by police in Diyarbakir during the 28 March local elections and three of them had to be hospitalised. Those responsible have still not been punished. Reporters Without Borders has drawn attention to the continuing problems for press freedom in Turkey on the eve of a visit to Paris by Prime Minister Erdogan on 20 October. “Despite progress towards European standards, the gap between the declarations of good intentions and reality is still considerable, with the result that the conditions for real press freedom are still not being met,” the organisation says. to go further Follow the news on Turkey News Receive email alerts TurkeyEurope – Central Asia RSF_en April 28, 2021 Find out more October 18, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Questions raised about press freedom in Turkey on eve of Erdogan visit to France Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism law News Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor News April 2, 2021 Find out more News April 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Last chance to purchase JCA ornaments

first_img You Might Like TIS THE SEASON: PLAS Patriots give thanks during Christmas Program Thursday (PHOTOS) Second and third grade students at Pike Liberal Arts School perform during the school’s Christmas program, A King is Born,… read more Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson “While I love to paint the Southern Experience, I know that art transcends race, nationality and language,” Casey said. “Pain is pain, love is love, loneliness is loneliness and war is war. Art transcends time, space and people. Many of my images are women familiar to me but I don’t really know them.”Casey’s hope is that her artwork will empower, “for the viewer to have a companion in his crossroads.” Print Article The Johnson Center for the Arts will be closed Dec. 22 through Jan. 4 in preparation for the new exhibitions that open Jan. 6.However, the arts center well be open from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. today and Saturday so those who have not had an opportunity to visit the current exhibitions and the Center’s Pop-up Store will have a last chance.“The Christmas tree display is in the Upper level Gallery and Susan Berry’s Nutcracker display is in the Tile Gallery,” said Vicki Pritchett, Center executive director. “Dr. Doug Hawkins’ European Masters exhibit is in the lower gallery. The Christmas trees are beautiful, the Nutcrackers are delightful and the European Masters exhibit is one not to be missed.” Published 3:00 am Friday, December 19, 2014 Book Nook to reopen Sponsored Content This Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s… Skip By Jaine Treadwell Pritchett said the Center’s 2014 Christmas ornaments by Mary Ann Casey are still available and are some of the most unique ornaments the Johnson Center has offered.“Mary Ann’s ornaments are fashioned out of hand-cut ceiling tin and barn tin,” said Wiley White, Center development coordinator. “She paints each ornament with a Madonna and Child motif in acrylic and then seals the design. A tiny metal cut heart, stamped and fired with the word ‘Hope’ is affixed to each ornament.”Casey, a Rehobeth native, paints with her heart. Email the author By Secrets Revealed Latest Stories Last chance to purchase JCA ornaments “I want those who view my artwork to realize that we all have within us this tremendous capacity to be more than we ever imagined,” she said. “We can walk through the tight valley of high walls that close us in, the walls of prejudice, jealousy, greed, social standing and abuse.” Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Academics’ pay rises as budgets fall

first_imgFurthermore, this increase is not limited to the Russell Group. A Telegraph report claimed that more than 950 university staff, including Vice Chancellors, were paid more than the Prime Minister in 2010 and that last year Liverpool Hope University announced intentions to cut up to 110 jobs whilst increasing Vice-Chancellor Gerald Pillay’s salary by 20.6% to £199,077.With the total cuts to universities for 2012/2013 standing at around 3.4% and the typical teaching academic being paid £42,263 on average, Bauer’s and Chessum’s ‘University High Pay Report: One Alternative to Cuts’ states, “it is worrying that UK universities are now spending 2% more on increasing the wages of their very richest employees”. This claim is supported by the Times Higher Education survey and by university financial statements. Analysis of these statements, conducted by accountancy firm Grant Thornton, shows that whilst total income packages dropped by by 1.21% in 2009-2010, the average spending by universities on salaries in isolation rose by 0.6%. A government-commissioned review of public-sector pay by the Work Foundation discovered that the pay-gap between the highest and lowest paid staff was greatest within the higher education sector.[mm-hide-text]%%IMG_ORIGINAL%%5548%%[/mm-hide-text]Students have expressed concern at these increases when education in the UK is facing stringent cuts this year. According to the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), core teaching funding is being reduced from £3.6bn in 2011/2012 to £2.4bn in 2012/2013 (a 34% decrease). And, despite the counteractive action of raising tuition fees, recent statistics show that the number of available courses over the past six years has been reduced by 27% and there will be around 11,000 fewer places for first year undergraduates available at universities next year. Emma Wilson-Black, a second year student at Mansfield College, said, “At a time of cuts and austerity I would consider it deeply wrong and socially divisive to pay Russell Group university VCs massive salaries. I consider lecturers crucial to the education system rather than the few individuals at the top of the system who gain ridiculously inflated salaries.”She continued, “The government is already facing criticism that its ‘education reforms’ will create a two-tier system where poorer students find it even harder to access top universities. This presents a vision of education where elitism dominates.”The Times survey of Vice Chancellors across the UK also revealed that 26% of VC’s went to state schools, 39% to grammars and 20% to private schools (there was no data available on the remaining percentage). However, amongst the chancellors of the Russell-Group, 35% were private-schooled, in contrast with only 7% of privately schooled Vice Chancellors in the Million+ research intensive institutions, (Million+ is a ‘think-tank’ of post-1992 institutions, formerly known as the Campaign for Mainstream Universities.)Somerville student and president of the Oxford Socialist Worker Student Society, Fraser Anderson, agreed with Wilson-Black. He said, “Revelations about the increases in Vice Chancellors’ salaries at a time of unprecedented attacks on higher education are yet another confirmation that we’re not all in it together. This is what Stefan Collini called the ‘world of McKinsey’, where education policy is shaped by people like former BP boss, Lord Browne, and the chief of McKinsey’s Global Education Practice, Sir Michael Barber. In their world it’s huge salaries for top executives – higher fees and cuts to jobs, pay and libraries for the rest of us.”However, not all Vice Chancellors pay packets have experienced an increase. For instance, the London School of Economics reduced their Vice Chancellor’s pay by £67,000 between 2010 and 2011 to £218,000 a year whilst Sheffield reduced their Vice Chancellor’s salary by £17,000 to £294,000 per annum. One student commented, “I think its important to remember that whilst education is facing cuts, the Russell Group contains some of the best universities in the world. Places like Oxbridge still manage to compete globally despite the huge financial advantages that institutions such as the Ivy League can offer students.”He added, “I believe that the money within higher education should be more evenly spread between the VC’s and the average academic staff member if the University wishes to attract a larger proportion of high-calibre teachers. What’s the point in competitively paying for brilliant leadership if we can only afford to pay competively for a moderate workforce?”Oxford University said that the pay for the Vice Chancellor reflected the calibre of the University itself. A spokesperson said, “It is certainly one of the two best universities in the UK and among the handful of best universities in the world.”She added that the influence of Oxford on the UK also accounts for the high salary. She stated, “It makes a major contribution to the economic prosperity of the UK and the UK’s position in the world, as well as to tackling global challenges through its research. Its research output is vast, it has an almost billion-pound-a-year turnover not including the colleges and OUP, and it has great institutional complexity. Its Vice Chancellor’s salary reflects that.” A report released by the National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts last month attacked the increasing income of Russell Group academics, of whom Oxford’s Vice Chancellor, Andrew Hamilton, received the highest income in 2011, £424,000. This sum is closely followed by the Vice Chancellor at University of Birmingham’s salary of £419,000 and the Vice Chancellor of University College London, who received £365,000 last year. These accounts show that Russell Group universities have spent an average of around £318,000 on Vice Chancellors’ salaries, benefits and pensions over the last year.The NCAFC report was written by Edward Bauer, a student and Vice-President of Education at Birmingham University, in collaboration with Michael Chessum, member of NUS and organizer for NCAFC; it also expresses concern at the rate at which these incomes are increasing. According to the report, the income of the Vice Chancellors of the University College London and University of Birmingham increased by £27, 345 and £27,000 respectively between 2010 and 2011, whilst the Vice Chancellor of Nottingham followed with an increase of £9,057 over the past year. These figures are supported by each university’s annual finances report.This report also reveals that the rise is not limited to Vice Chancellors, alledging that there has been an increasing amount of universitys’ incomes spent on jobs paid a salary of over £100,000 a year. It claims that the percentage of the Russell Group’s total income that was spent on high paid jobs has increased by over 2%, from 1.832% in 2003/2004 to 3.849% in 2011/2012.Furthermore, this increase is not limited to the Russell Group. A Telegraph report claimed that more than 950 university staff, including Vice Chancellors, were paid more than the Prime Minister in 2010 and that last year Liverpool Hope University announced intentions to cut up to 110 jobs whilst increasing Vice-Chancellor Gerald Pillay’s salary by 20.6% to £199,077.With the total cuts to universities for 2012/2013 standing at around 3.4% and the typical teaching academic being paid £42,263 on average, Bauer’s and Chessum’s ‘University High Pay Report: One Alternative to Cuts’ states, “it is worrying that UK universities are now spending 2% more on increasing the wages of their very richest employees”. This claim is supported by the Times Higher Education survey and by university financial statements. Analysis of these statements, conducted by accountancy firm Grant Thornton, shows that whilst total income packages dropped by by 1.21% in 2009-2010, the average spending by universities on salaries in isolation rose by 0.6%. A government-commissioned review of public-sector pay by the Work Foundation discovered that the pay-gap between the highest and lowest paid staff was greatest within the higher education sector.Students have expressed concern at these increases when education in the UK is facing stringent cuts this year. According to the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), core teaching funding is being reduced from £3.6bn in 2011/2012 to £2.4bn in 2012/2013 (a 34% decrease). And, despite the counteractive action of raising tuition fees, recent statistics show that the number of available courses over the past six years has been reduced by 27% and there will be around 11,000 fewer places for first year undergraduates available at universities next year.Emma Wilson-Black, a second year student at Mansfield College, said, “At a time of cuts and austerity I would consider it deeply wrong and socially divisive to pay Russell Group university VCs massive salaries. I consider lecturers crucial to the education system rather than the few individuals at the top of the system who gain ridiculously inflated salaries.”She continued, “The government is already facing criticism that its ‘education reforms’ will create a two-tier system where poorer students find it even harder to access top universities. This presents a vision of education where elitism dominates.”The Times survey of Vice Chancellors across the UK also revealed that 26% of VC’s went to state schools, 39% to grammars and 20% to private schools (there was no data available on the remaining percentage). However, amongst the chancellors of the Russell-Group, 35% were private-schooled, in contrast with only 7% of privately schooled Vice Chancellors in the Million+ research intensive institutions, (Million+ is a ‘think-tank’ of post-1992 institutions, formerly known as the Campaign for Mainstream Universities.)Somerville student and president of the Oxford Socialist Worker Student Society, Fraser Anderson, agreed with Wilson-Black. He said, “Revelations about the increases in Vice Chancellors’ salaries at a time of unprecedented attacks on higher education are yet another confirmation that we’re not all in it together. This is what Stefan Collini called the ‘world of McKinsey’, where education policy is shaped by people like former BP boss, Lord Browne, and the chief of McKinsey’s Global Education Practice, Sir Michael Barber. In their world it’s huge salaries for top executives – higher fees and cuts to jobs, pay and libraries for the rest of us.”However, not all Vice Chancellors pay packets have experienced an increase. For instance, the London School of Economics reduced their Vice Chancellor’s pay by £67,000 between 2010 and 2011 to £218,000 a year whilst Sheffield reduced their Vice Chancellor’s salary by £17,000 to £294,000 per annum. One student commented, “I think its important to remember that whilst education is facing cuts, the Russell Group contains some of the best universities in the world. Places like Oxbridge still manage to compete globally despite the huge financial advantages that institutions such as the Ivy League can offer students.”He added, “I believe that the money within higher education should be more evenly spread between the VC’s and the average academic staff member if the University wishes to attract a larger proportion of high-calibre teachers. What’s the point in competitively paying for brilliant leadership if we can only afford to pay competively for a moderate workforce?”Oxford University said that the pay for the Vice Chancellor reflected the calibre of the University itself. A spokesperson said, “It is certainly one of the two best universities in the UK and among the handful of best universities in the world.”She added that the influence of Oxford on the UK also accounts for the high salary. She stated, “It makes a major contribution to the economic prosperity of the UK and the UK’s position in the world, as well as to tackling global challenges through its research. Its research output is vast, it has an almost billion-pound-a-year turnover not including the colleges and OUP, and it has great institutional complexity. Its Vice Chancellor’s salary reflects that.”A report released by the National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts last month attacked the increasing income of Russell Group academics, of whom Oxford’s Vice Chancellor, Andrew Hamilton, received the highest income in 2011, £424,000. This sum is closely followed by the Vice Chancellor at University of Birmingham’s salary of £419,000 and the Vice Chancellor of University College London, who received £365,000 last year.These accounts show that Russell Group universities have spent an average of around £318,000 on Vice Chancellors’ salaries, benefits and pensions over the last year.The NCAFC report was written by Edward Bauer, a student and Vice-President of Education at Birmingham University, in collaboration with Michael Chessum, member of NUS and organizer for NCAFC; it also expresses concern at the rate at which these incomes are increasing.According to the report, the income of the Vice Chancellors of the University College London and University of Birmingham increased by £27, 345 and £27,000 respectively between 2010 and 2011, whilst the Vice Chancellor of Nottingham followed with an increase of £9,057 over the past year. These figures are supported by each university’s annual finances report.This report also reveals that the rise is not limited to Vice Chancellors, alledging that there has been an increasing amount of universitys’ incomes spent on jobs paid a salary of over £100,000 a year. It claims that the percentage of the Russell Group’s total income that was spent on high paid jobs has increased by over 2%, from 1.832% in 2003/2004 to 3.849% in 2011/2012.last_img read more