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Settlement agreement closes Barbara Harris Center embezzlement case

first_imgSettlement agreement closes Barbara Harris Center embezzlement case Posted Nov 21, 2019 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing [Diocese of Massachusetts] The Barbara C. Harris Camp and Conference Center in Greenfield, New Hampshire, will receive a little over $300,000 under an Oct. 30 settlement agreement, bringing to a close the embezzlement case involving the center’s former bookkeeper, Beverly Morello, which has been in progress for nearly two years.The settlement money is to be paid over an eight-year period at five percent interest.The settlement is in addition to the restitution that the Hillsborough County Superior Court ordered in May, in the amount of $650,000, along with a one-year jail sentence for Morello and eight years of probation.While the settlement does not restore the full amount stolen from the center over a period of approximately seven years, the Executive Committee of the center’s Board of Directors, its legal counsel and the Charitable Division of the New Hampshire Office of the Attorney General believe it to be the best possible and most realistic outcome.“We believe that we have done our best possible diligence toward recovery of funds, and we are confident that, with this settlement agreement in place, the Barbara C. Harris Camp and Conference Center can now move forward and flourish in its ministry of hospitality, recreation, spiritual refreshment and Christian formation, which touches and transforms lives throughout our New England Episcopal Church and beyond,” the president of the center’s Board of Directors, the Rev. Natasha Stewart, said.Questions arose in late October 2017 about some bookkeeping irregularities at the center. An internal investigation led to the discovery of the embezzlement of funds.  The Board of Directors, through its president and Executive Committee, responded immediately to secure all accounts and to report the situation to the appropriate authorities.“I want to emphasize to all who participate in and support the Barbara C. Harris Center’s ministry, and all who continue to be served by it, that the Board has been working over these many months with the staff to review procedures and to make sure that appropriately stringent financial controls are being implemented,” Stewart said.The Rt. Rev. Alan M. Gates, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, has expressed his confidence in the process which has led to the settlement. “I am grateful to our Board members for their diligence, to the professional counsel that has supported them and for all the prayerful support we’ve had along the way,” Gates said. “We emerge from this very challenging situation more committed than ever to the mission of the Barbara C. Harris Center, and all those whose lives are transformed in that remarkable place.”The Barbara C. Harris Camp and Conference Center is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization and a ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more

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Really Responsible offers cash and project management staff to smaller charities

first_img  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Management Recruitment / people Really Responsible offers cash and project management staff to smaller charities AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Management training and consultancy company Really Responsible is offering to help up to 50 small and medium sized charities each year with cash and skilled personnel to complete a specific project. There is no cost to the selected charities, says the company.The initiative is open to not-for-profit organisations with an annual turnover of less than £3 million and applications from charities are now invited.The Really Responsible team will match skilled and experienced project managers to charities and they will work with them part-time, committing up to four days a month to their chosen project. Participating charities will also each receive £1,000 in cash, and the seconded staff will receive support from the Really Responsible training team for the duration of the project.Really Responsible say that the funding for this programme will be provided by corporate investors who put staff onto a six month leadership programme.Helen Morris-Brown, founder of Really Responsible Training® said: “When I was the Development Director for a small charity we were fortunate enough to take part in a secondment scheme. We worked with the (then) marketing director from American Express who provided us with the skills and contacts to undertake a rebranding exercise. It was a huge success and we would never have had the money or expertise to complete the exercise in-house. My aim is for other charities to benefit in the same way.”Nigel Greenwood, Former Marketing Director, American Express said: “I have been seconded to charities in the past and have first-hand experience of similar initiatives. While I was able to share my skills and support projects that I feel passionate about, I did not receive formal training as part of the process. Helen and her team have come up with something where both the charity and the volunteer grow”.The next application deadline for charities is 31 March 2011.www.reallyresponsible.com Howard Lake | 11 February 2011 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Paschal mercy rules Sam Houston despite struggles

first_img Previous articleRestaurant Review: Righteous FoodsNext articleBreaking the mold: Multi-sport athletes defy conventional wisdom The 109 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ + posts The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store ReddIt print TCU athletes are “SPARK-ing” an interest in Fort Worth area students Facebook The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ The 109 For most of three innings Friday night, Paschal made few mistakes and led 2-0. The final three frames were filled with more runs, but also far more miscues.The Panthers (6-6, 3-1 Dist. 4-6A) put seven runs on the board in the sixth en route to a 12-2 mercy rule victory after six innings over Arlington Sam Houston(0-5, 0-4). For coach Darrell Preston, however, Paschal’s blunders on defense and missed opportunities at the plate stood out more than the final score.“We kind of played down a little bit,” Preston said. “Some of that is to be expected when you come off two big wins, but this game is about adjustments. We coached it, preached it the two days before the game, and we come out and didn’t execute.”Right-hander Drew Medford got the start for Paschal, retiring the first three batters in order. Preston kept Medford on a pitch count, however, moving him to catcher after two innings. Sophomore Ben Ayana took over on the mound in the third.The Panthers loaded the bases for Medford with no outs in the third leading 1-0. The junior hit a full count sac fly to left to bring in Cal Quevedo to make the score 2-0. But Sam Houston’s Enrique Herrera was able to escape the inning without any further damage, despite having two on and just one out.Sam Houston put Ayana in a jam in the fifth. Leading 3-0, Ayana gave up a double to Caesar Aguilar. Elliot Cerrillo then hit a pitch hard toward short that popped off Reese McDonald’s glove to put runners on second and third.Aguilar scored from third to make it 3-1 on an error by Paschal’s William Floyd, who tried to throw home on a grounder to first but was off target. Brian Gonzales then hit an RBI groundout to make it 3-2.“We kind of tried to walk through it,” Preston said. “We did everything opposite of what we were coached to do.”The Texans gave the Panthers a lot of help in the final two frames. After Paschal extended its lead to 5-2 in the bottom of the frame on a two-run double by third baseman Sergio Conchas, RBI singles by McDonald and Medford ran the lead to 7-2. Floyd, Conchas and Johnny Pulido then drew three consecutive walks with the bases loaded to put Paschal up 10-2.On the Texans’ third pitcher of the inning, Ayana drove in two runs with a bases-loaded single to make it 12-2 and enact the mercy rule, which goes into effect if there is a 10-run lead after five innings.Despite Paschal’s troubles, Medford earned praise from his coach after the game. The junior gave the Panthers a 1-0 lead with an RBI single in the first. He finished the night 3-of-4 with 3 RBI.“He’s a ball player,” Preston said. “He’s a field rat, he’s a great kid to have around. He’s always wanting to be at the ball park. I’m proud of him. He’s one of our better players, and he’s a leader. And he has a chance to play this game for a long time.”Quevedo’s RBI groundout in the fourth inning gave the Panthers a 2-0 lead. He was 2-for-3 and also had a stolen base.The Panthers will go on the road to face Arlington Martin and Arlington Bowie next week. Preston said that to beat those squads, his team can’t make the same mistakes it made Friday.“It’s nice to get the win, don’t get me wrong,” he said. “But the Paschal program is not going to play like that.” Facebook Twittercenter_img TAGSBaseballPaschal Fort Worth braces for more severe weather TCU athletes are “SPARK-ing” an interest in Fort Worth area students The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Linkedin Linkedin Gary Patterson’s Christmas has come early.”What (the NCAA) needs to do is put us with somebody ranked,” head coach Gary Patterson said after TCU’s last game against Air Force Academy. “Put a Boise State with one of our teams in some bowl game if they want a little publicity if Boise doesn’t go to a BCS game.””I think they are definitely a BCS team.”Patterson said he is looking forward to facing the Broncos. Stories from the polls: Election Day in The109! ReddIt Twitter Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturdaylast_img read more

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Oman: newspaper editor held over article about pressure on judiciary

first_img News OmanMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abuses Receive email alerts RSF calls for release of Omani journalist and writer Sulaiman Al Moamari News Organisation to go further ©Azamn Reporters Without Borders (RSF) deplores Omani newspaper editor Ibrahim Al-Maamari’s detention by the Muscat police for the past five days for reporting that that senior officials had pressured the judiciary in a case involving a large inheritance.center_img Follow the news on Oman The editor of the daily Azamn, Ibrahim Al-Maamari was arrested on 28 July in connection with an article published two days earlier alleging that government officials tried to get the judicial authorities to change a 2015 ruling in the case in order to benefit certain influential figures.“We condemn Ibrahim Al-Maamari’s arrest and continuing detention,” said Alexandra El Khazen, the head of RSF’s Middle East desk. “By punishing this journalist in this way and by keeping him in detention, the Sultanate of Oman is sending a negative message about media freedom and is demonstrating an inability to tolerate criticism of the political and judicial system. We call for an independent and impartial investigation and for Al-Maamari’s immediate release.”A public prosecutor’s office spokesman said the offending newspaper article was regarded as “a public crime,” one that discredited the integrity of the judiciary and government officials. He said a number of complaints had been received, leading to Al-Maamari’s arrest under article 4 of the Criminal Procedures Act. There were other as yet unnamed “suspects,” he added.The prosecutor’s office said the article was incorrect, that there was still no final decision in the inheritance case and that Al-Maamari, by publishing false information, had violated articles 25 and 29 of the Press and Publications Law, which is punishable by up to two years in prison and a fine.He is also accused of undermining the prestige of the state under article 135 of the Penal Code and publishing news that would disturb public order under article 19 of the Cyber Crimes Act.Azamn wanted to run a story about his case on its front page yesterday but the information ministry did not authorize it so instead Azamn printed half of its front page blank in protest. It also published an editorial that included solidarity messages from intellectuals. A source close to the newspaper told RSF that Al-Maamari has not been allowed to receive visits or communicate with anyone at the newspaper.This is not the first time that the authorities have targeted Al-Maamari and Azamn. Al-Maamari was arrested and sentenced to five months in prison in September 2011 (and the newspaper was banned for a month) because a May 2011 article was deemed to have insulted the justice minister and one of his deputies. The sentence was quashed after Azamn published an apology although the conviction was upheld on appeal in January 2012.Meanwhile, Almoatasem Al-Bahlani, the editor of the online magazine Al-Falq, was freed on 28 July after being held for two days in connection with comments he posted on Twitter, the Omani Observatory for Human Rights has reported. The official reasons for his arrest have not been made public.The Sultanate of Oman is ranked 125th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index. August 2, 2016 – Updated on August 3, 2016 Oman: newspaper editor held over article about pressure on judiciary OmanMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abuses RSF_en Help by sharing this information May 12, 2016 Find out morelast_img read more

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Podcast: June 1, 2019 – Limerick Post News Roundup

first_imgLifestyleNewsPodcastsSportPodcast: June 1, 2019 – Limerick Post News RoundupBy Cian Reinhardt – May 30, 2019 104 TAGSartartselectionsentertainmentEnvironmentlifestayleLimerick City and CountylistenNewspodcastSport Belltable:Connect invites applications for Translating Live to Online Workshops this Autumn Cian Reinhardt looks at the content in this week’s Limerick Post newspaper, giving a run-down on this week’s Business, Politics, Sports, Arts and Entertainment news. This week’s podcast is brought to you in associations with EZ Living furniture, Where everything is reduced for this bank holiday weekend.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In this week’s headlines:Limerick says yes to a directly elected mayor.We look at the local elections.Limerick’s keen on bee-keeping.Meghann Scully chats about what’s going on this week in Limerick.And much more. Email Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick City Gallery of Art exhibition showcases ‘Limerick Connections’ through artists over the past 50 years Linkedin Facebookcenter_img Limerick Artist Receives Arts Council Next Generation Award worth €20,000 Print Limerick Connections exhibition at Limerick City Gallery of Art Limerick centre needed to tackle environmental issues Advertisement Whiff of trouble lingers over gasworks Previous articleI Hear You and RejoiceNext articleVOTE An Ríocht for the Public Choice RIAI Architectural Award 2019 Cian Reinhardthttp://www.limerickpost.ieJournalist & Digital Media Coordinator. Covering human interest and social issues as well as creating digital content to accompany news stories. [email protected] WhatsApplast_img read more

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Nall taps Alabama roots in new exhibit

first_imgLatest Stories Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Nall taps Alabama roots in new exhibit He gives much of the inspiration for his “Bouquets and Local Color: Artwork by Nall” exhibition that opens Friday at the Eastern Shore Art Center in Fairhope to his Alabama roots.“As I call Alabama home, much of my inspiration comes from early morning walks on the Fairhope beach collecting driftwood and found objects from the natural abundance of Mobile Bay,” Nall said. “The camellias in my artwork remind me of my grandmother’s gardens in Troy with her 15-foot bushes and were the inspiration for my latest porcelain series, ‘The Bellingrath Collection.’”Nall said his grandmother was constantly going to Europe and bringing back Meissen antique porcelain from Germany, antiques, and paintings. By Jaine Treadwell Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson “She traveled widely and eventually became a tour guide, knowing all the good addresses in Europe,” Nall said. “Her influence on things European had a profound impact upon my becoming an artist, living in France, and being interested in the more refined things in life. Her sister, Glennie Trotman Mashburn, lived in the Panama Canal area for many years, and was a painter who raised lots of pets and orchids.“Thelma Loman Hollis Middlebrooks lived across the street on Murphree Street and was a seamstress, influencing me in clothes making.”Nall most recently designed costumes for the Puccini Festival in Torre del Lago, Italy.He even created a gingerbread house in a zoo, which was “finally done as an arty foundation” in Vence, France. This Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s… Nall, a classically trained artist, has traveled the world studying diverse cultures and exploring art, architecture and indigenous craft.But no matter where his travels take him, to North Africa, India, the Middle East, South America and Mexico, he always comes back to his roots in Alabama.With the “Bouquets and Local Color” exhibit, Nall said he is presenting flowers and landscapes from his “home” to the viewers.The opening reception for “Bouquets and Local Color” will be at 6 p.m. Friday at the Eastern Shore Art Center at 401 Oak Street in Fairhope. Everyone is invited. Sponsored Content Around the world, Nall is considered a modern day Renaissance man. Around town, Nall is known as the artist grandson of Lucy Trotman Nall.And, that’s all right by him.Nall has always been proud of being a Troy boy and a son of the South. Skip Email the author Published 6:33 am Thursday, January 5, 2012 By Secrets Revealed Book Nook to reopen Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration You Might Like Clayton man charged with in vehicle theft From staff reports Troy Police arrested a 33-year-old Clayton man on Tuesday  in connection with the unlawful breaking and entering… read more Print Article Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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A special Mother’s Day

first_img “Because my grandmother stood in for Mama,” Cowart said. “My grandmother stood in my mama’s shoes and I thank God for her.”Cowart said there is and will always be a void in her life left by the loss of her mother but that hole was filled with the love and caring of her grandmother.“What a blessing my grandmother was,” Cowart said. “She set a path for me to follow.” Email the author A special Mother’s Day Cowart has been blessed with eight children of her own, 15 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. She is mother to them all.“And what a blessing they are. All of them. Every one of them,” Cowart said. “Now, I didn’t plan on having eight children, seven girls and one boy.  but I wouldn’t take anything for any one of them.”However, Cowart, laughingly, admitted that she did pray for a boy.“Every mother needs a son,” she said, with a smile. “And I did pray for him.  I didn’t have to pray for the girls; they just came as blessings.” Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Published 8:54 pm Friday, May 7, 2021 Skip Sponsored Content Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Latest Stories By Jaine Treadwell Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Alice Mae Cowart was seven years old when her mother died.She remembers asking “Where’s Mama?” and “When’s she comin’ home?”But she doesn’t remember when she stopped asking those questions. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Jaine Treadwell | The MessengerAlice Mae Cowart’s mother died when she was 7-years-old. She said she was thankful her grandmother stood in her mother’s shoes. She is pictured above with her children and dancing on her 80th birthday. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Print Article Cowart didn’t plan on naming all her children with the beginning letter, “L.”Linda, Lillie, Laura … that’s when she gave thought to the letter “L.”Love begins with the letter “L” and love begins at home, Cowart said.So, Lessie, Leon, Lavonne, Lisa and Lorraine brought more love into the Cowart home.“The ‘L’ stood for Love for each other,” Cowart said. “If you have that kind of love you can make it through whatever life brings your way.”Life was not always a smooth path but Cowart drew her strength from the Bible, especially the wisdom found in Proverbs.“I studied Proverbs and the one verse that helps put everything in the right place is ‘Honor your father and mother.’ And that doesn’t just mean your own father and mother. It means all of those old enough to be your father and mother. If you honor them all, then everything will go the godly way. What’s wrong in the world today is we have left God out of the picture. We have not honored Him. We have not honored our fathers and mothers, all.”The Bible gave Alice Mae Cowart direction in life and assurance of God’s will for her. God also gave her the love of praise music and has been so influential in her life.“Oh, I grew up singing,” Cowart said. “We didn’t have even a radio; we just sang. My grandpa sang the old-style music, the kind of music that has a message and means something. Most of the time we just sang acapella, that’s without instruments. Sometimes, somebody would play the guitar but most of the time it was just our voices.”Cowart said all of her children sing and her grandchildren, too.“We’ll all be around the house and the next thing, we’re singing,” she said. “And we do, I guess you could say, concerts and we sing that old music. A lot of people will come so I guess that old kind of music still fills the hearts of people.”Cowart’s life has been full and good but there have been trying times and God has seen her through it all.“God gave me a good father for my children and they have stood beside me when I was going through some problems with my health. I had a place to go. My daughter had a room for me at her house,” Cowart said and added laughing, “I had some good food, too.“And, I am blessed now to be able to care for my daughter that has to be on dialysis, three times a week.  That’s the way the Lord works, He provides. The Bible says there is a time to go and time to come. That means, a time to go help others and a time to let help come to you.”Looking back on her life, Cowart said every day has been a blessing.“Yes, I have been blessed,” she said. “Looking back on my life, I can’t say I’ve had a hard time. A blessed time is what I have had. Oh, I worked in the fields. We picked up pecans and raised chickens and hogs. I worked hard but I didn’t mind working. Work is good for you. I did everything with the help of the Lord. And, when times were good and when times were not so good, we’d strike out on a song. Oh, how I love singing.”Cowart said there are so many songs that fill her heart with hope, praise and joy but “My Day of Joy is Coming” is, perhaps, her favorite.Cowart is looking forward to Mother’s Day 2021 because it, too, will be a day of joy and blessings.“To have all my children with me is the best Mother’s Day gift I could have,” she said. “And, we’ll strike out on songs and it will be a day of blessed joy.” By The Penny Hoarder Patriots fall in state tournament The Pike Liberal Arts Lady Patriots began play in the AISA State Tournament at Lagoon Park in Montgomery on Friday… read more You Might Like Book Nook to reopenlast_img read more

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Authorities identify gunman who killed 5 at Molson Coors brewery

first_imgKamil Krzaczynski/Getty Images(MILWAUKEE, Wis.) — Law enforcement officials have identified the employee of the Molson Coors Beverage Company who gunned down five co-workers at the company’s Milwaukee Brewery campus as 51-year-old Anthony Ferrill.Ferrill left the MillerCoors campus and returned to the site with a gun on Wednesday around 2 p.m. local time, law enforcement officials briefed on the probe told ABC News.No other victims were injured in Wednesday afternoon’s mass shooting, Milwaukee police said. Ferrill died from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, police said.The attack garnered a massive response of first responders to the brewery.“There are no words to express the deep sadness many of us are feeling right now,” Molson Coors CEO Gavin Hattersley said in response to the shooting.Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said in a statement, “Our hearts go out to the families of those whose lives were senselessly taken, all of the folks and workers at Molson Coors, and the Milwaukee community as we grapple with yet another act of gun violence that will have long-lasting consequences for this community and our state.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Police investigate claim that armed men cut down tree to force neighbor’s quarantine

first_imgamphotora/iStock(VINALHAVEN, Maine) — Police in Maine are investigating an alleged incident in which armed residents used a tree to block a man’s driveway in order to quarantine him and his roommates from the coronavirus.The man, who is renting the house in the town of Vinalhaven in the Fox Islands, left the house to check on a severed cable line Friday afternoon and discovered that a tree was blocking his path, the Knox County Sheriff’s Office said.Several people with guns allegedly approached the resident and yelled at him, according to the sheriff’s office.The man ran back into the home and he and his roommates used a VHF radio, their only means of communication, to contact authorities, the sheriff’s office said.“Several law enforcement entities arrived in the area and found the felled tree but no group of people,” the sheriff’s office said in a Facebook post. “It was apparent that the tree had been cut down and dragged into the roadway to block it.”The town has an order that mandates that anyone who came onto the island recently had to self-isolate. However the man said that he and his two roommates arrived last month, before the cutoff point for the order.The sheriff’s office said they believe the tree was an attempt to block the exit of those from out of state from leaving the house, and that they will continue to investigate.“Whether someone is a Maine resident or not, they have the right to free movement and anyone who infringes upon that free movement is potentially violating the law,” the office said in a statement. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Rapid discrimination between four Antarctic fish species, genus Macrourus, using HRM analysis

first_imgCorrect identification of species forms the basis of all biological studies from individual genetic variation to population genetics, stock assessments and understanding whole ecosystems. This often relies on skilled taxonomists or molecular techniques to identify species, the time and cost of which can be prohibitive to many research opportunities. High resolution melt (HRM) analysis offers a potential quick and cost effective method of genetic screening and an alternative to DNA sequencing to confirm species identity. This technique was successfully tested for its ability to discriminate between four genetically similar species of Antarctic fish, genus Macrourus, where morphological identification can be problematic due to overlapping characteristics. The technique was shown to be fast, robust and reliable even with samples where DNA yield was of poor quality and quantity. There is great scope for the application of this technique in biological research, fisheries management and conservation genetics.last_img read more