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Oxford University releases welfare and support figures

first_imgCW: Mental health, rape, sexual assault “In keeping inclusive teaching and learning at the heart of our strategymoving forward, it will eventuallybecome unnecessary to make special arrangements for most disabled students.Instead, their needs will have been anticipated and largely met, and they canbe treated like any other student, which we know many would prefer. However,support services will still remain available and accessible at all times. The University reports that demand for the service was higher than expected. Feedback to the service was positive with respondents saying they were comfortable speaking to their advisor. However, only 10 of the 52 students contacted gave feedback. Due to the increased demand, the average waiting time for an appointment increased slightly to 8.9 working days. Similarly, the average number of counselling sessions per student is at an all-time low level of 3.1.  Feedback for the Counselling Service and the Disability Advisory Service (DAS) was largely positive. 95% of students rated their experience of the Counselling Service as good or very good, and 90% of students said that the support arranged for them by the DAS was helpful. The report states that it provides support to students who have been accused of sexual harassment and violence. The Service supported nine accused students last year. “The user response to our Sexual Violence and Harassment Service isequally encouraging to see. The University continues to work in collaborationwith local services like OSARCC to provide support to anyone affected by theseincidents.  “Earlier this year the University signed up to Big White Wall, and cannow offer 24 hour online mental health support to all students. The move toremote learning during the pandemic has been challenging for all, and we wantour students to feel connected and supported at all times.  To helpstudents during the lockdown we have also released targeted welfare and mentalhealth advice through our blog and podcasts. The number ofstudents declaring a disability has risen to 17.9% of undergraduates, a totalof 4,387 students. The most common disability declared are mental healthconditions (29.6%), followed by learning difficulties (27%). The University has also released statistics for the Sexual Harassment and Violence Support Service, which was launched in the 2018-19 academic year. The Service provides support to any students affected by sexual harassment and violence.  Oxford SU Disability Campaign and It Happens Here have been contacted for comment. In response toincreased demand, the University recruited additional advisors, reducing thestudent to advisor ratio. A specialist mental health advisor was alsointroduced to support the increased number of students disclosing mental healthissues. The University ofOxford has published its statistics for Student Welfare and Support Services inthe 2018-19 academic year.  The report shows that demand for the Counselling Service increased, with 12.1% of students seeking counselling. This represents a 0.9% increase on the 2017-18 figure. The number of students accessing counselling has risen consistently since 2007-08,  when 5.5% of students sought counselling. In total, 2,958 students accessed the Service in 2018-19. The report says:“There is increasing evidence that we are now under-serving some students,sending them away without having had adequate time to make secure progress.This is reflected in greater numbers of students returning to the serviceseeking supplementary sessions.” “There is always room for improvement and student feedback continues to be vital to the effectiveness of our services and the support that we provide. Where concerns are raised we commit to engaging constructively with students to address them.” The vast majority of students accessing the Service were female. Almost 150 female students sought support compared to 21 male students. Rape and sexual assault accounted for 44% of the cases reported. Gilian Hamnett,Director of Student Welfare and Support Services, said: “We are pleased and heartened to seesuch high levels of satisfaction from students using our welfare and supportservices. Supporting thewellbeing, safety and mental health of all of our students is always a keypriority for the University. As demand has increased for our counsellingservices, waiting times have also alongside this (8.9 working days), howeverthey remain significantly below the sector-wide average wait time of 52 days. Image credit to James / Flickrlast_img read more

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Greenhalgh’s crafts giant hot cross bun

first_imgGreenhalgh’s Craft Bakery has baked a giant hot cross bun, which was unveiled last week at the RSPB’s Saltholme wildlife reserve.The Easter treat – which is in the process of being verified by Guinness World Records – was created to help promote the activities taking place at RSPB reserves over the Easter weekend. The hot cross bun measured 8ft in diameter, and weighed a hefty 169kg – the equivalent of around 2,300 regular hot cross buns – and looks to have beaten the current record-holder in South Africa, SASKO bakeries.It was baked in a custom-made tin, that is due to be reused as a birdbath at the RSPB’s headquarters. It took five bakers a day to prepare and bake, with over 65kg of flour used.David Smart, production director at Greenhalgh’s, said it had been one of the bakery’s more unusual bespoke requests. “We were delighted to be tested on such a large scale and to help achieve a notable World Record while assisting a worthwhile charity,” he said.last_img read more

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Press release: UK and Argentina take on co-chair of Equal Rights Coalition

first_imgThe United Kingdom has taken on the role of co-chair of the Equal Rights Coalition (ERC), in partnership with Argentina (14 June 2019).The Equal Rights Coalition is the first intergovernmental network formed to promote and protect the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people around the world. The ERC’s membership works with civil society and allows both governments and civil society to share their national policies and practices on this agenda.The UK is a global leader on the promotion and protection of LGBT human rights and is committed to ensuring the success of the ERC, a grouping of 42 like-minded states working together to defend and advance the human rights of LGBT people around the world.Priorities for the UK in their period as co-chair include: Follow the Foreign Office on Instagram, YouTube and LinkedIn a refreshed ERC Strategy to guide, shape and re-energise the work of the Coalition delivery of an international LGBT rights conference in London in 2020 that seeks to address the key issues facing global LGBT equality the co-ordination of the ERC’s work plan with the Global Equality Caucus, a new international network of parliamentarians and elected representatives due to launch later this month, and which intends to host its first global convening at the international LGBT rights conference in London in 2020 Email [email protected] Further informationcenter_img Follow the Foreign Office on Twitter @foreignoffice and Facebook For journalists Media enquirieslast_img read more

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Dorrit Cohn

first_imgDorrit Cohn, internationally recognized as a major literary theorist and one of the first women to be appointed to tenure at Harvard (she joined the Harvard Faculty in 1971), was born Dorrit Claire Zucker in Vienna, Austria, the younger daughter in a prosperous, assimilated Jewish family. Her father, Herbert Zucker, owned a hat factory in a small town in Czechoslovakia, where the family often spent summer vacations. Her mother, née Hirsch, belonged to a family that pioneered the manufacture of bentwood furniture in the same town. Dorrit grew up with the cultural and educational privileges of her class: she studied music, was fluent in French, and loved theater and opera. This comfortable life came to an abrupt end in March 1938, when Hitler’s troops marched into Austria and annexed it to Nazi Germany. The Zucker family had the good fortune to leave the country just before the Anschluss. The following year, after temporary sojourns in Zurich and Paris, they arrived in New York, where Dorrit was enrolled in the Lycée Français and obtained her baccalaureate.In 1941, Dorrit was admitted to Radcliffe College, graduating four years later with a major in physics. She liked to tell the story of how she switched from physics to literature. The decision came to her like a revelation in her senior year, after reading Thomas Mann’s novel The Magic Mountain while recuperating from an illness. Mann’s writing changed her life, and she was later to devote one of her best-known essays to his complex use of the narrative voice in his novels.In 1945, Dorrit Zucker started graduate work in comparative literature at Radcliffe where she obtained a Master’s degree; the following year she enrolled in the Ph.D. program at Yale, where she met and married her fellow student Robert Greer Cohn. Like many women at the time, she felt she could not combine a demanding career with marriage and motherhood. After the birth of her first child, Steve, in 1949, she interrupted her studies and did not resume them again until 1962. She obtained her doctorate from Stanford with a dissertation on the Austrian modernist novelist Hermann Broch. Soon after, she was offered a teaching position at Indiana University, moving there with her children. She earned tenure and remained in Bloomington until 1971, when she was appointed Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures at Harvard. In 1984 she was invited to join Harvard’s Department of Comparative Literature.In 1980, Dorrit and several other colleagues founded the undergraduate concentration in Literature, whose focus was on literary theory, a somewhat neglected subject at Harvard until then. This was the heyday of structuralism and poststructuralism, methodological approaches that proposed to analyze literary texts as autonomous entities governed by their specific modes of functioning. Dorrit made a landmark contribution to the field of narrative theory in 1978 with the publication of her book Transparent Minds: Narrative Modes for Presenting Consciousness in Fiction, a landmark work that is still assigned in graduate seminars today as the standard work on the subject. The attention it has received recently from scholars studying theory of mind and evolutionary psychology reveals just how wide and lasting the influence of this work has been.All of Dorrit Cohn’s scholarly writings had a luminous quality. Although she claimed to address dry, technical issues, when it came to the study of narrative, she turned science into art as she explored the intricacies of Kafka’s The Castle, Freud’s case histories, and works by authors ranging from Proust and Beckett to Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal, and Mann. Her prize-winning book The Distinction of Fiction (published in 1999, when she was 75 years old) captured in its title a hallmark of her scholarly work. She was a master in making fine distinctions and in taking texts apart, only to put them back together again in ways that led to deeper understanding and appreciation. She famously worried about her esprit géométrique, when in fact her work always bore the mark of finesse and had the stamp of real style.The same can be said of Dorrit Cohn’s teaching. Students flocked to her courses on the modern novel, on turn-of-the-century Vienna, and on the fairy tale and novella. Quietly charismatic, she combined broad erudition and disciplinary rigor with intellectual firepower. She taught her students the pleasures of deep, complex literary analysis and modeled for them how to combine analytic precision with attention to textual detail and cultural connotations. Her students went on to teach at major research universities, with many of them continuing her work, but less as loyal disciples than as adventurous scholars striking out into new territory. She always resisted the idea of merely perpetuating methodologies rather than renewing and reinvigorating them; she felt slightly embarrassed, rather than flattered, by imitation.After retiring from Harvard in 1995, Dorrit studied Ancient Greek and wrote about Platonic dialogues. She translated works from French and German, most notably Jean-Marie Schaeffer’s Why Fiction?, and she continued to read widely in fiction and literary criticism. At her second home in Wellfleet, where she had spent the summers for many years, she swam and played tennis with her family and with colleagues and students, who had the chance to enjoy her hospitality and share her love of Cape Cod.Dorrit Cohn died on March 10, 2012, of complications from Parkinson’s disease. She is survived by her two sons, Steve Cohn, Director of Duke University Press, and Richard Cohn, Battell Professor of Music Theory at Yale University, and by four grandchildren, as well as by many friends, colleagues, and students who cherish the memory of a scholar who taught us how to read fiction and how to explore minds, always with transparent distinction.Respectfully submitted,Donald FangerWerner SollorsSusan Rubin SuleimanMaria Tatar, Chairlast_img read more

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Sustainable Ag Research

first_imgResearch faculty and UGA Cooperative Extension specialists with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are hosting a sustainable agriculture field day 6-8 p.m. Thursday, June 25 at the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center in Watkinsville, Georgia. Researchers will discuss the latest findings for corn and forage production practices to help increase profitability and decrease environmental impacts. These findings include a new living mulch system for corn, new forage varieties, cover crops to supply nitrogen and information on some of the equipment used to manage the farm. Farmers and those interested in conservation land management should plan to attend. “The Campbell (center) has a lot of interesting research going on to help farmers be more productive and profitable,” said Julia Gaskin, sustainable agriculture coordinator for UGA. “Many of these approaches are also better for the environment. It’s nice to be able to highlight research that has the potential to be a win-win solution.” Registration will be free and participants can register on-site. Parking will be available at the Oconee County Civic Center, 2661 Hog Mountain Road in Watkinsville. Shuttles will transport participants to and from the J. Phil Campbell center’s west unit field site every 10 minutes. The field day features eight stations, including: Living Mulch and Corn: UGA’s pioneering living mulch system will be showcased with sweet corn and field corn. The living mulch concept uses a perennial legume to provide weed control and nitrogen fertilizer to row crops. Its success depends on row width, crop population density and the amount of clover killed. These plots demonstrate how last year’s management is affecting this year’s crop.Soil Erosion and Water Quality in Corn Systems: Use of the living mulch system in a corn crop is expected to reduce soil erosion and the amount of nutrients lost. Researchers are comparing runoff and nutrient loss in the living mulch and conventional corn production systems.Corn/Clover System Water Quality and Use: Corn can be a “leaky” production system, where fertilizer nutrients are lost to groundwater. Researchers will share what they’ve found about how a living mulch system reduces nutrient loss and possibly conserves soil moisture.New Equipment: Farm manager Eric Elsner will give visitors a rundown on the equipment used to manage the farm, including no-till planters and drills, an over-the-row hooded sprayer and a hay unroller.The Forage Garden: Learn about Georgia forages by a touring a garden that includes forages used extensively in Georgia for pasture, hay and silage production, as well as some novel forage species and varieties. Forage Variety Development: UGA forage breeders will explain what traits they are breeding for when developing varieties suitable for conditions in Georgia and the Southeast. Nitrogen Release from Cover Crops/Organic Grain Corn: Researchers will discuss a new Nitrogen Availability Calculator that is available to predict a nitrogen credit from cover crops, and will discuss how this can be used in U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service programs. They will also discuss growing organic corn.Soil Microorganisms and Soil Inoculants: Can locally produced microbes enhance forage growth or legume productivity? Researchers are evaluating the use of inoculates in forages fertilized with swine manure and in legumes fertilized with composted broiler litter.For more information, check the UGA Sustainable Agriculture website at sustainagga.org or email Julia Gaskin at [email protected]last_img read more

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Sanders seeks support for Vermont State Hospital

first_imgUS Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) has brought together Obama administration officials, Vermont state lawmakers and the state Department of Mental Health commissioner to discuss federal funding for the Vermont State Hospital. Restoring the hospital’s certification could yield $10 million or more a year in federal reimbursements for the facility that the state now spends more than $20 million annually to operate and maintain.The state hospital in Waterbury first lost its federal certification in 2003, regained it in 2004, but lost it again in 2005. The lack of certification makes the facility ineligible to claim Medicare or Medicaid reimbursements that could cover more than half of the hospital’s costs.In July, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, citing concerns about supervision of a single patient, again denied certification for Vermont’s only state-run mental hospital. The decision followed an unannounced visit by investigators to the 54-bed psychiatric hospital.While federal investigators have cited lapses, the hospital was certified in 2008 by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals, an independent, not-for-profit organization which accredits and certifies more than 15,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States.“The quality of patient care must be our top priority, but the state and Vermont taxpayers deserve a reasonable process for correcting problems and restoring the hospital’s certification,” Sanders said. “In these difficult financial times, it is unfair to Vermont taxpayers that the state is losing out on $10 million a year in federal reimbursements.”Sanders convened the meeting of representatives from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Commissioner Michael Hartman of the Vermont Department of Mental Health, and state Sens. Susan Bartlett (D-Lamoille) and Diane Snelling (R-Chittenden).“We are on the same page and they gave us a path forward,” Sanders said afterward.Sen. Bernie Sanders meets in his U.S. Senate office in Washington, D.C., with (L to R) Cynthia Mann, director of Medicaid and State Operations for the U.S. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Commissioner Michael Hartman of the Vermont Department of Mental Health, and Angela Brice-Smith, deputy director of surveys and certification for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Photo by Frank Fey for the U.S. SenateSource: Sanders’ office. WASHINGTON, October 20, 2009last_img read more

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FFIEC to FIs: Brace for extortion cyber attacks

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council issued a statement, “Cyber Attacks Involving Extortion,” Tuesday alerting financial institutions of the increasing frequency and severity of this particular breed of cyber attacks.Cyber attacks against financial institutions to extort payment in return for the release of sensitive information are increasing, the FFIEC said. continue reading »last_img read more

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Getting creative and driving results with integrated campaigns

first_imgSquare one is always going to be the audience. When we understand our audience, we understand what they’re looking for and how we can connect the dots so they know how we can fulfill their needs. A good list of questions to answer includes:Where can you reach them? Do they prefer doing their business in person, on the phone, or online? Are they active in the community? Where are all the spots that you can find them in their daily life? Use the answers to these question to help you select which channels to use.What’s important to them right now? The shorter the duration of your campaign, the more specific you can get. If there is a special occasion or current event that’s taking over the attention of your audience – holidays, elections, football season – you can incorporate that in your campaign. Make it a part of the promotion or offer solutions during tough times. A question I get asked a lot is ‘how can we make our next campaign different and more interesting?” This comes up with CEOs looking for growth just as often as with marketers wanting to shake up the status quo. Because when our tried-and-true campaigns start missing their marks, it is time to rethink how we’re tackling the marketing calendar. At the heart of it, what credit unions are really asking about is finding creative ways to drive more results. Results being a mix of new accounts, engagement, and retention. But not everyone has unlimited resources to devote to marketing. So there’s always the constraint of keeping the man-hours and budget down.My number one response to this kind of question is designing an integrated campaign that leverages the credit union’s strengths to meaningfully interact with their intended audience.An integrated campaign is simply a marketing campaign that uses a consistent message across multiple channels, including advertising, sales promotions, direct marketing, social media, and event marketing. It’s intended to educate and engage an audience in a variety of ways and in a number of places, nudging them along their sales journey. This style of campaign has been around for a while, but it evolves over time as new channels and platforms pop up – making it continually relevant. It also give us just enough of a framework to get us started when we’re trying to get creative about campaign design and execution. Making Your ImpactWith an integrated campaign, we need to identify a strong message that can be used across multiple channels. The overarching theme and offer needs to be consistent, but we have flexibility to shape each piece of marketing content to the individual channel. That flexibility makes integrated campaigns incredibly fun. To help narrow down ideas, stay focused, and drive results, try using these 4 tips: Know Your Audience Leverage Your StrengthsYou can do yourself a lot of favors by regularly assessing your credit union’s strengths and leveraging them whenever possible. Maybe you have an incredibly knowledgeable team that has years of experience and great stories to share. Maybe you have beautiful branches that can easily host events. Or, maybe you have lots of business partners and can collaborate to promote each other’s offering. Whatever your strengths are, finds ways to use them in your campaign. When you utilize content that you already have, expertise that exists, photography skills available, or connections that are enthusiastic about working with you, your job becomes much easier. Maintain ConsistencyIt’s easy to let constancy slip when we’re working on a campaign with extra moving parts. Remember, the overarching theme and offer needs to stay consistent. Then, you can shape each particular piece to work best with the channel you’re using.Keep the language, images, colors and fonts complimentary and it’ll be easier for your audience to recognize the campaign when they see it in different places. If you view an online ad, a social media post, a video in the branch, and a workshop worksheet next to each other, you should be able to tell that they are part of the same campaign. Create a High-Quality ExperienceWhile you’re creating the offer and the different pieces of your campaign, don’t forget to consider what the experience looks like from start to finish. It can be incredibly helpful to have a central place with all of the campaign details – usually a landing page that is easy to list on your printed materials and point to in online links. Besides a general place for additional details, what do you want your audience to do with your promotion? What can you do to make it easy for them to complete that action and interact with the credit union? Take into account how your audience likes to do business and try to make that an option when you’re designing your calls-to-action. Wrapping it up with an ExampleYour campaign is going to be unique to your credit union, but let’s use an example to illustrate how you could go about an integrated campaign using these tips. Let’s say that our credit union primarily works with families in one particular community. This audience is getting ready for spring break and they are looking forward to family-oriented, out-of-town trips in the next 1-2 months. Day-to-day, they can be found checking out news online, flipping through their social media feeds, and helping their kids manage their extra curricular activities. The credit union wants to increase credit card activity and gain new credit card accounts. There is a rewards program, the credit union has a good social media following, and the main branch is located on a main street that has lots of retail shopping and an active chamber of commerce that runs events like an upcoming sidewalk sale.Now we can start looking for the overlap in the credit union’s strengths and what the audience needs to create a fun campaign.To give members and non-members extra incentives to open or use the credit card, we can offer some additional rewards and contests that make spring break travel more enjoyable. To make sure we reach the audience, we can use social media, online search, the physical branch, and the community event.Working within any brand guidelines, the credit union can use travel images and language about getting away for some family-bonding time. Main points can include:Extra reward points for gas and travel purchases. Tying in the local opportunity and sidewalk sale, run a contest involving making local purchases for entries. The giveaway could include things for the vacation like a tablet, headphones, and small items from local shops. Added-value content placed online and on social media has travel tips: keeping your accounts safe, considerations for international travel, and tips for helping kids manage their money during vacations.Posters, banners and window clings in the branch can help drive awareness around the timeof the sidewalk sale. Social media, email blasts, and online ads can drive activity to a central landing page with more details and an application. Collaboration with local shops and the chamber could lead to cross-promotional efforts in the stores or through their online channels.As you can see, campaigns have many more possibilities when you choose an integrated approach and leverage the resources available. Consider an integrated campaign the next time you want to try something new and let your creativity run wild. You’ll start discovering new ways to reach members and even better results in your marketing efforts. center_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jennifer Laud Jennifer is a credit union marketing consultant and the owner of Jennifer Laud Consulting. She has a background in strategy and a passion for positioning credit unions to find their … Web: www.jlaud.com Detailslast_img read more

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House of Fraser spots gap in City retailing

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Iranian lawmaker dies of novel coronavirus

first_imgAn Iranian lawmaker died from the novel coronavirus on Saturday, state news agency IRNA reported, one of several officials to succumb to the illness in the epidemic-hit country.Fatemeh Rahbar, 55, was a conservative MP and had recently been elected to the parliament from the capital Tehran, the agency said.She is the second lawmaker killed by the virus in Iran and one of seven politicians and government officials who have died in the outbreak since the country reported its first cases in mid-February. Iran has been scrambling to contain the rapid spread of the virus, which so far has infected 4,747 people and killed at least 124.Rahbar was among the top candidates in Tehran for the conservatives, who overwhelmingly won February’s general election marked by the lowest turnout in the Islamic republic’s history.Iran has closed schools and universities, suspended major cultural and sporting events and reduced working hours across the country to slow the contagion, which has spread to all of its 31 provinces.Topics :last_img read more