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Blocked From Pope’s Synod By Ebola, Liberia’s Bishop Tells His Nation’s Story

first_imgOne bishop is absent from Pope Francis’ Extraordinary Synod of the Bishops on the family. He was invited, he wanted to come, his name is on the participant list, but he is not in Rome. He is some 4,000 miles away. And few—if any—people outside the synod hall even know he is not there.His name is Bishop Anthony Borwah, 48, and he leads the Catholic Diocese of GBarnga in central Liberia, where Ebola is wreaking havoc. Tony, as he is called, learned he could not travel to the Synod in late August, when the Ivory Coast closed its borders due to the Ebola outbreak and restricted the one airline that could have taken him to Abidjan, where he needed to apply in person for a Schengen visa to travel to the European Union.Borwah may not be at the Synod, nor is he able to participate remotely due to technological limits, but the gathering’s focus on the family is vital to his Liberian families. Ebola is their most urgent challenge, but it is not the only one, he explained to TIME in this exclusive interview. Borwah submitted an essay to the Synod—an “intervention” in Vatican-speak—about the situations facing Liberian families. Borwah’s essay is not being read aloud at the Synod but will be entered into the written record and considered in any final documents that the Synod produces.“Enormous are the pastoral challenges of the family in Liberia today,” his essay begins, before continuing to describe the challenges including Ebola, polygamy, migration, unemployment, the lack of a father-figures, domestic violence, child trafficking, and sexual tourism. “Existential questions from the poor, prevalently during the Civil war, are been asked again: Where is God? What wrong have we (Liberians) done again? How come we have once again become the abandoned and scum of the earth?”The past few months since Ebola outbreak have been brutal for Liberia, where about 69% of the population is Christian, according to Pew Research Center. Borwah has lost dear friends to the virus, including his spiritual director, Father Miguel from Spain, his mentor and medical doctor Abraham Borbor, and his prayer partner Tidi Dogba. While the Catholic community as a whole has not had many deaths in Gbarnga, he says, those who are dying are relatives and friends. “As Bishop of my people I carry within my heart their wounds and pains every moment of life here,” he says.The Liberian Catholic community is doing what it can to combat the virus. Borwah has called on all Catholics in his diocese to gather in prayer against Ebola from 5 to 6 p.m. every day from September 1 through November 30. The church uses the first ten minutes for education and updates about Ebola, and then for the last 50 minutes they pray with the Holy Rosary. They are observing strict medical rules about what kind of interaction they can have while together for prayer. No touching, no handshakes, and entrances of churches, homes, and offices have buckets of chlorinated water for hand washing.The Catholic Church is also collaborating with the government on the national Ebola Task Force Team, Borwah says. The National Catholic Health Team is training nurses in three Catholic dioceses in Liberia, and Catholic clinics remain open. “Our Human Rights Department is also actively involved in violations issue[s] that may occur under such a crisis situation and the state of emergency when rights are restricted,” Borwah adds. “We hope to soon begin the distribution of food to mainly quarantined communities and other affected areas.”The Ebola devastation extends beyond just a health crisis for Liberian families. The virus’ highly contagious nature means that family members are kept at a great distance from infected loved ones. Ignoring the restriction, on the other hand, can lead to death, but Liberian families are very affectionate especially in difficult times, Borwah explains, and the inability to show real human kindness is wounding morale.Poverty is also increasing, he says. Already more than 80% of families in Liberia live below the poverty line, according to the Central Intelligence Agency. Now the price of rice and other essential commodities has spiked since the ebola outbreak due to port and border closures, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Labor shortages due to migration restrictions are also putting the fall’s rice and maize harvests at risk. Women, the FAO has noted, are particularly hard hit as many are the primary caregivers and can’t repay their small business loans. Schools are closed while the virus is present, and so students stay home and teachers do not get paid. “The Ebola situation has badly crippled the economy resulting in rife impoverishment and hunger,” Borwah says.Increased poverty means increased desperation over the loss of family members to Ebola, he continues. That frustration is compounded when the government buries or cremates loved ones, often without family members present. “These new wounds are a tragic addition to festering wounds that families here experienced as a result of a more than 15 years of fratricidal civil war that officially ended a decade ago,” he says.Borwah is grateful for global aid groups and donors like Catholic Relief Services and CAFOD, the official Catholic aid agency for England and Wales, but more support is needed, especially when it comes to supporting survivors. “Recently one of the survivors—my kinsman—committed suicide when people avoided him and he felt that he was unworthy of love anymore,” Borwah says. “We need more support to feed the thousand whom are hungry and angry and to care and counsel the Ebola survivors who carry the stigma.”There is a dimension to the Ebola outbreak that also concerns him—the idea that Ebola’s spread could have a man-made and not just a natural source. “I believe that the causes of Ebola are not just physical but spiritual,” he says. “I like calling it the ‘Ebola phenomenon’ because it’s existence raises more questions than answers.”Then there are Liberia’s non-Ebola-related challenges. Infidelity in marriages is common, with the causes ranging from poverty (mostly on the part of the women) and cultural permissiveness (on the part of the men), he says. “Generally the economy of the nation is in the pocket of few men, hence there is a lot of women prostitution,” he says. “I often say that these prostitutes are prophets and friends of Jesus as they signify the inequality, marginalization and injustice meted out against the poor and nobodies of our society especially women.”Women, he adds, are generally subject to men culturally, and are often subjected to brutal domestic violence and impoverishment. The government of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has done a lot to raise the dignity of womanhood in beloved Liberia, he continues, but “the walk is still too long.”Families are navigating questions of shifting identity. Western technological and cultural shifts mean that young people often have different value systems from their parents, and that is dividing families. “Parents can no longer control their children in the face of this new ethics, something, which brings a lot of pain and worries about the future of the family,” he says.Borwah has a message for the world: “The friends of Jesus Christ—the nobodies, the poor, women and the innocents, the caretakers of others—need both the spiritual and material help. They are losing faith, hope and love. They are poorer, hungrier and very desperate. God has not and will not abandon us, so please do not abandon us to the onslaught of Ebola.”And, in the midst of it all, Pope Francis, Borwah says, has not forgotten the Liberian people. “The Holy Father prays for Ebola stricken people everyday, even as the Synod goes on,” Borwah says. “He is very close to our suffering.”His final words: “Please pray for us.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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`The Power of Pink’

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.But by the end of the morning, all participants were enriched to the brim, hugging each other, laughing, enjoying – and looking forward to the ninth annual conference in the fall of 2009. (Mark your calendars!) But all this mental stimulation was just the beginning. With so many women in the captive audience, it was only fitting that Cathy Alessandra and Linda Wenglikowski, event co-chairwomen, would add an opportunity for serious shopping into the mix with a lineup of accessory boutiques. Because proceeds from this year’s conference go toward the hospital’s breast cancer programs, the keynote speaker, appropriately, was cancer survivor and entertainer Ann Jillian. To add to the spirit of gratitude, two women were honored by LCM with major awards. Foundation president Joseph Zanetta awarded the 2007 Mary Potter Humanitarian Award to LCM benefactor Marie Crimi Roser, a 10-year member of the board of trustees and former vice chairwoman of the $50million legacy campaign. “I wish I could say `Please, please support Little Company of Mary Hospital,’ but that would be preaching to the chorus,” she said, adding, “I have gotten so much more from the other volunteers than I have given.” If you didn’t make it to Friday’s wildly successful eighth annual Women’s Wellness Conference, “The Power of Pink” at the Torrance Marriott Hotel, give yourself 20 lashes for missing a chance to celebrate being alive with 600-plus radiant, wonderful, blessed, “smokin’ hot” South Bay sisters. In a single morning, attendees of the daylong benefit for Little Company of Mary Community Health Foundation found inner peace by living in the present, learning about spiritual well-being through dream therapy, discovering how to live in harmony with teens and learning how to have sensational skin (depending on which two seminars they chose to attend). What’s more, they learned how to avoid identity fraud, discovered the secret of a flat tummy, and even learned “how mama got her groove back.” No wonder a number of attendees take a mental health day off from work to give themselves this day of fun, friendship and fulfillment. The only stress was deciding which programs to attend. Imagine having to choose between your soul and your sex life, your teen and your identity. Next, Beverly Wishon, director of the hospital’s Medical Staff Affairs, introduced Kathy Harren, LCM chief nursing officer, as winner of the 2007 Sister Nancy Boyle Award for Excellence. In accepting the award, Harren quoted a former executive of Nike who left to “find himself” and traveled the impoverished areas of the world. “What he learned,” she said, “is millions of people in the world would do anything to do this good work, and we are the lucky ones.” She added that good work is never done alone. “It has to be done shoulder to shoulder with others.” Following lunch, Jillian, 57, spoke with great humor and candor – even throwing in a well-tuned rendition of “Amazing Grace.” No, Jillian may no longer be that blond beauty with the big eyes, the bob and the bangs. But she’s just as lovely on the inside. “I know, I know. I’m not as blond, not as young and not as thin, but I am here, baby,” Jillian said in her opening remarks, to a burst of applause. “Without faith and a good sense of humor, we couldn’t get through much in life.” Among her words of wisdom, Jillian acknowledged that “challenges and transitions” are what it takes “to survive and thrive.” She credited her parents, who escaped from Lithuania on a ship headed for America during World War II, for her strong faith. And she acknowledged Betty Ford for pointing out that it is OK to cry, but not for too long. “My motto is: After you pray, accept, adapt and then move on and live your reward,” she said. Following an hour’s talk laced with witty one-liners and recollections of celebrities including Bob Hope and Johnny Carson, Jillian took questions. Regarding having reconstructive surgery after a mastectomy, she said she opted not to, but respected those who do. “Who we are comes from within. The rest is cherries on the cake,” she said. “Given the choice between looking again into my son’s eyes and losing an inch or two (she pointed to her breast), I’ll take life.” Meredith Grenier 310-540-5511, Ext. 494 meredith.grenier@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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RAPHOE STUDENT IS GETTING READY TO THRASH THE FASHION

first_imgCharlene having a swinging time in her group’s outfit. Photo Brian McDaidCharlene Rodriguezis from Lifford, Co. Donegal is a student at the Royal and Prior in Raphoe and she just loves talking fashion and….thrash!She is pictured in a dress her school completed for the Trash ‘n’ Fashion competition.The name of my group’s outfit is called “Minimal” as they wanted to create an outfit with a monochrome colour scheme and geometrical design. Charlene and her team mates Mitchell Goudie, Odhran Shiels say they were fascinated by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, and used this as inspiration for the dress.The bottom half of the outfit was created by folding used paper (from worksheets to exam paper) into diamond structures and sewing them together.The top half was created using both recycled cardboard and paper in 3d triangular structures.“I really enjoyed my experience with Trash “n” Fashion as it helped build up my confidence in public performance and seeing what beautiful creations can be made from something that would be seen as garbage,” said Charlene. This years Trash ‘N’ Fashion show take place on the 19th of May in the Mount Errigal Hotel in Letterkenny.RAPHOE STUDENT IS GETTING READY TO THRASH THE FASHION was last modified: May 9th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalLiffordRaphoeTrash N Fashionlast_img read more

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McENIFF TO BECOME LOUTH SELECTOR

first_imgDONEGAL GAA legend Brian McEniff is to become a selector….for County Louth.The man who led the county to all-Ireland glory in 1992 had been advising Louth manager Peter Fitzpatrick this year.But that role is to become more official for the 2012 season with the Donegal businessman set to be made a selector. McENIFF TO BECOME LOUTH SELECTOR was last modified: November 4th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Brian McEniffdonegalLouthselectorlast_img read more

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Cancer Care group say ‘we are not going away’ in open letter to Minister Harris

first_imgDonegal Action for Cancer Care (DACC) have today sent the following letter addressing Minister Harris, the Minister of Health; Mr. Maurice Power CEO, Saolta University Hospital Group; Mr. Sean Murphy, General Manager of Letterkenny University Hospital.DACC say that they pride themselves on working within an Ethos of Respect but recent months have really tested their resolve.“Even though we are voluntary and unpaid, and work within an Ethos of Respect, there comes a time when we must do the right thing and what we can for Donegal’s sick folk & community.” DACC say that they have tried several times to meet Minister Harris and get answers to their questions, to no avail.Below is a copy of the letter sent by Betty Holmes of DACC this morning:“Dear Minister Harris, Mr. Power & Mr. Murphy,“It is very important to state clearly that the matters in this letter are separate from the outstanding matters & very long overdue meeting from the meeting at Dept. of Health on the 20 th August 2015. Minister Harris with respect as per our many letters including the recent 3 regarding meeting request having the follow up meeting in same format when you are at LUH on Monday 12 th Dec. “We are asking you all three at this time in the hope that accountability will prevail and we can get answers. We have had major difficulty getting answers to any of our questions over many months.“The questions below are being asked to be answered as soon as possible please in light of yesterday’s announcement that “HSE considers using prefabs to ease trolley crisis”. These may appear to be very basic but both need to be asked & answered please.> How many hospital beds does Letterkenny University Hospital have in total?> How many hospital beds have been available to patients in the last 3 months?> How many hospital beds are closed?> How many wards or other bed providing areas are closed at LUH?> How many patients have been admitted to LUH in the last month?> How many patients in the last month were unable to access a bed on admission?> How many front line staff is needed to safely manage patients health care needs at LUH?> How many front line staff has left or is off sick at LUH in the last 6 months?> Are any Prefabs on the agenda to be allocated at LUH? If so how many & when? If so how will they be paid for? Out of what budget?> Is LUH on the list for Prefab/Prefabs?> As the tender process is starting & intended to conclude in early December how will this process happen? Who will decide on the successful tender?> When is it intended that the Prefabs would be installed?“Letterkenny Hospital needs budget & staff allocation based on its In Patient work & recognition at National level for the work, service provision, developments over many years. Instead of repeatedly trying to take key services from Letterkenny strategic planning should be focusing on the hospital’s achievements & growing needs instead of downgrading it.“Letterkenny Hospital was a leader in many areas over many years till recent years when the focus is on downgrading it! This must stop. We Donegal folk will not accept it… Recognise the work our hospitals both the General & Community Hospitals.“Other outstanding questions regarding Cardiac Services at LUH we sent to LUH General Manager by letter on the 3rd October and also reminders since then… Hopefully we can now get these answered also please. Addressing Mr. Sean Murphy, general manager of LUH, Betty Holmes writes:“Dear Sean,“Can you update us please on the following?> How many Cardiologists does Letterkenny University Hospital currently have?> How many clinics per week does each of these Cardiologists hold?> What days of the week are clinics held & by what Cardiologist? Where are these clinics held at?> How many patients approx. have each of these Cardiologists on their clinic lists?> Is it true that it takes 3 months to have an Angiogram at LUH? Why? Details please.> Is it true that the Urgent Waiting List is approx. 9 months? Why? Details please.> Is it true that the Waiting List to see a Cardiologist at LUH is approx.2 years? Why?> How much does it cost from LUH budget to send a patient to Altnagelvin Hospital as part of the new cross-border cardiology service for Donegal patients suffering from a STEMI heart attack?> The new Cardiologist announced for Letterkenny Hospital on the 7th April by the then Minister for Health Mr Varadkar has a person been recruited & that post now filled?> Also the Consultant Interventional Cardiologist at Letterkenny University Hospital, who will help to deliver the pPCI service from Altnagelvin announced also at that time by The Saolta Group, has that post been filled? Whose hospital budget funds this post?> Will these two additional Cardiologist post announced in April be stationed at LUH or are they both primarily to work at Altnagelvin?> Will LUH in the coming year/ years cease doing their own Angiograms & Angioplasty for its own patients?> What are the future plans for Cardiac Services at Letterkenny University Hospital? “And these questions by email to Mt. Murphy on the 15th November when we learned that LUH has no Social worker.> Since what date has LUH no Social Worker?> Why has LUH no Social Worker?> What is being done to address this serious matter?> When will a replacement Social Worker be recruited?“Also Minister Harris we are awaiting confirmation of our meeting with you and all those listed in our letters from the previous two meetings please.“We in DACC are totally voluntary and unpaid and with respect should NOT have to put the effort that we do to get meetings and answers to our questions… it’s really not acceptable. It is very hard to hold onto our Ethos of Respect for everyone when we look at how we are treated by those in positions of responsibility.We are not going way.Yours sincerely,Betty HolmesDACC also included the following image showing the route that Donegal patients must travel:Cancer Care group say ‘we are not going away’ in open letter to Minister Harris was last modified: November 21st, 2016 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Bye bye bargains

first_imgAir fares tumbled in 2015, but are on the march again. That’s the word from one of the authors of the most comprehensive report on the subject, the Australian Aviation & Airfare Analysis, produced jointly by the Centre for Asia-Pacific Aviation and 4th Dimension – the consulting arm of Australia’s biggest travel retailer, Flight Centre.4th Dimension’s general manager, Virginia Fitzpatrick, is talking about Australia, but she could also be describing North America, a glut of cheap discounts is now being wound back as airlines push for higher fares.Heavy discounts – pushed out the door willingly by the airlines – followed 2014’s oil price collapse that ended a decade when carriers were almost at war with their customers with new ancillary fees to ease the squeeze on their bottom lines caused by soaring jet fuel prices.Airlines in Australia and overseas have used their savings on fuel in the past 18 months to invest more in the customer experience on items like in-flight internet.In Australia, according to the CAPA-4th Dimension report, average air fares fell 5.77 per cent in this year’s first quarter after being pushed up by eight to nine per cent in 2015.“Virgin Australia … led Qantas in instigating fare increases throughout 2015, with six increases against Qantas’ four,” the report says.With the Australian economy faltering in this year’s second quarter, that situation has changed, but the Qantas-Virgin Australia duopoly, even with their low-cost subsidiaries Jetstar and Tigerair, has evolved into a much more sophisticated version of the old Qantas-Ansett contest.In fact, says Virginia Fitzpatrick, even though demand is subdued, both airline groups are tightly managing fares and yield – the price per seat – so that they don’t fall back into the financial bloodbath they inflicted on each other between 2012 and 2014 when the old Virgin Blue became Virgin Australia, a full-service airline, offering  business class for the first time.Both groups have scaled back planned growth in the number of seats they’re flying this year, which means they have to discount less to fill them.“I think this year, in reverse to last year, we’re going to see that those cheap seats are going to be sold early and quickly and both carriers are going to be selling high fares,” Fitzpatrick tells AirlineRatings.com. “They’re going to go for the high yield. With reduced seats, what do you get? Prices going up.”Fitzpatrick says, in spite of quiet market conditions that might have led in the past to increased discounting, “fares are being controlled dynamically daily by the airlines and they are very, very good at this”.  “They’re going to be driving up their yields,” she says. “That’s the only warning I can give. I think we’re in for a higher cost of travel.”While Fitzpatrick says they’re only her personal views, she is describing a new worldwide restraint by the airline industry, which lost billions of dollars after the 2001 terrorist attacks on the US and was clobbered again by the global financial crisis of 2007-08.Airlines are being very cautious about the possibility of being plunged back into losses by the possibility of yet another of the regular shocks that seem to beset the industry.In the US, fares have been dropping for more than a year and the average return fare late in 2015 was the lowest since 2010, according to industry figures. Ticket prices have fallen even further this year, the airlines say. But, as they saved billions of dollars on jet fuel, domestic and international carriers added seats faster than travel demand was growing and the major carriers are now taking steps to rein in the oversupply.last_img read more

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South Africa in digital laser ‘world first’

first_img17 September 2013 Researchers at South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) have developed a world-first digital laser that could be a game-changer in the field, paving the way for new laser applications in areas ranging from medicine to communications. A team based at the CSIR’s National Laser Centre has shown that, instead of resorting to expensive optics or other special mediating devices to control the shape of the light coming out of a laser, laser beams can be digitally controlled from within the laser device itself. The team’s findings were published in the 2 August edition of the prestigious journal Nature Communications. Announcing the breakthrough at media briefing in Pretoria on Tuesday, Science and Technology Minister Derek Hanekom said it was evidence of the country’s potential for scientific innovation. “That the world’s first digital laser should come from our country is testimony to the calibre of scientists that South Africa has,” Hanekom said. CSIR researcher Sandile Ngcobo, whose experimental work led to the breakthrough, said he believed the digital laser would prove to be a “disruptive” technology. “This is technology which may change the status quo and which could create new markets and value networks within the next few years or decade,” Ngcobo said in a statement. Prof Andrew Forbes, who led the team of researchers, said the digital laser used a liquid crystal display (LCD) placed inside the laser. “Just as with LCD televisions, the LCD inside the laser can [digitally] be sent pictures to display. When the pictures change on the LCD inside, the properties of the laser beams that exit the device change accordingly,” Forbes said. In a ground-breaking experiment at the CSIR’s laboratories in Pretoria, the team programmed the LCD to play a video of a selection of images representing a variety of desired laser modes. The result was that the laser output changed in real time from one mode shape to another. “This is a significant advancement from the traditional approach to laser beam control, which requires costly optics and realignment of the laser device for every beam change,” Forbes said. “Since this is all done with pictures, the digital laser represents a paradigm shift for laser resonators.” Laser technology already has widespread applications, in devices ranging from lighting displays to printers, DVD players, barcode scanners, surgical equipment and industrial cutters and welders. “The dynamic control of laser modes could open up many future applications, from communications to medicine,” Forbes said. “Our device represents a new way of thinking about laser technology, and we see it as a new platform on which future technologies may be built.” Forbes’ team included Ngcobo and fellow doctoral student Liesl Burger, and post-doctoral fellow Dr Igor Litvin. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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In photos – The Rann of the Agariyas

first_imgThe Agariyas start arriving by October, when the monsoon leaves behind the Little Rann of Kutch as a mud desert. They keep coming till April to mine salt in this 5,000-sq. km marsh in the west of Gujarat, the State which produces roughly three-fourths of the salt that India consumes. Thakarshi Bababhai Sankhalpura, 55, of the nomadic tribe says they arrive from places such as Banaskantha, Patan, Surendranagar, Rajkot, Morbi, Amreli and Kutch. The Agariya families now number 12,000 to 15,000 in Gujarat.With temperatures ranging from five to 50 degrees Celsius, high wind velocity and high soil salinity, the Little Rann of Kutch is an ideal place to mine salt. Using traditional knowledge, the Agariyas divine a salt-rich area and then dig a hole to draw out the saline water and channel it to a bed that becomes the salt pan. From 6 a.m., they start work, using diesel pumps for 18 hours to draw water and maintain the water level of the pan. Then they drop a type of grass in the water to help crystallisation. After a week or so, expert workers like Thakarshi Bababhai use a wooden implement, called dantalo in Kutchi, to comb the water for two hours each in the morning and afternoon so that the salt does not harden into slabs. Small and medium factories buy salt from the Agariyas. As the summer peaks and the temperatures soar to above 50 degrees Celsius, they stop work and leave.The tribe derives its name from the word agar, meaning salt farms. Their staple food is bajri no rotlo (millet roti) and mag ni dal (green whole moong), washed down with buttermilk. Conditions in the desert are harsh without electricity and water. Home to a rare breed of wild ass and visiting flamingos, the desert has been designated a wildlife sanctuary by the Gujarat government. Voluntary organisations such as the Agariya Heet Rakshaks Manch strive to protect the interests of these workers. Harinesh Pandiya of the organisation says it helps out with solar panels for power supply and facilities such as Internet vans for the Agariyas to stay connected with the outside world.last_img read more

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Podcast: Anthrax, sea monkeys, and what you can’t hear can still hurt you

first_img 00:0000:0000:00 Tanning Addiction, Veggie-Eating Neanderthals, and More Tracking anthrax in zebras. Sea monkeys that stir the seas. And what you can’t hear can still hurt your ears. Science’s Jia You chats about these stories and more with Science’s Sarah Crespi. Plus, mapping the ocean from outer space.TESTSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Roces rues lack of teamwork as BanKo Perlas remains winless

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netBanKo Perlas skipper Sue Roces said Wednesday it’s her team’s lack of teamwork that’s been the major factor in their skid at the start of the Premier Volleyball League Open Conference.The Perlas Spikers started the tournament 0-2 and their latest defeat was at the hands of Pocari Sweat in four sets, 25-21, 22-25, 25-19, 27-25, at Filoil Flying V Centre.ADVERTISEMENT “We haven’t been complete since the start of the conference,” said Roces who had 12 points in the loss. “We really lack the players so we really can’t rotate our pieces, and we still lack the teamwork.”“Just a little more, but we still need to be complete as a team.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsBanKo started its campaign in the Open Conference without Kathy Bersola, Nicole Tiamzon, who were on vacation after graduating from University of the Philippines, and Rysabelle Devandero.Roces said they’re able to practice but some players have day jobs and they couldn’t organize off-court activities where the players can bond outside of volleyball. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games PLAY LIST 01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games00:50Trending Articles02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Beermen celebrate with fans as Grand Slam talks continue Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend LATEST STORIES Nikki Valdez rushes self to ER due to respiratory tract infection China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong “We’re able to practice every day but some of us are working, some are only able to join us at night,” said Roces. “We don’t have any time to bond so I guess that’s another thing we have to work out.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera MOST READlast_img read more