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Past players back Windies

first_imgFormer West Indies players Sir Andy Roberts, Jackie Hendriks and David Williams have given the West Indies the edge in the final of the 2016 ICC World Twenty20 in India today. Describing the Caribbean aggregation as best suited for the format, and having the psychological edge after defeating England in the preliminaries, as well as the momentum after overcoming title favourites India in the semi-finals, the trio, however, believes it will come down to application. “I think it’s going to be another win for us,” stated Hendriks, referring in the process to the regional side’s triumph over Sri Lanka four years ago. “They (England) are a good team, but I think that the West Indies are best for this type of cricket. “I think if we keep our heads, our bowling attack can keep them within any total we set, as well as we have the batting to chase down any total they set,” the former wicketkeeper added. Roberts, a member of the pioneering Clive Lloyd-led ICC World Cup 50 overs winning teams of 1976 and 1979, highlighted bowling as the key to victory. “If we bowl well by restricting the amount of sixes, as well as bowling a lot of dot balls, that will be the key to success,” cited Roberts. “We have been bowling well in patches with the spinners, particularly (Samuel) Badree and (Sulieman) Benn, playing extremely well. “However, the medium pacers such as Andre Russell, Dwayne Bravo and Carlos Brathwaite have at times allowed things to slip.” Williams, meanwhile, a wicketkeeper for the West Indies teams in 1990s, and former West Indies assistant coach, believes the strength of the team’s batting will prove decisive. “The Englishmen should have some headaches when we bat,” Williams said. “We have a lot of match-winners, and have picked up some form, and that is worrying for any opposition. “It’s not just Chris Gayle anymore. Lendl Simmons and Johnson Charles have come along, Marlon Samuels and Dwayne Bravo are there, as well as the hitting power of Andre Russell, Darren Sammy and Carlos Brathwaite.”last_img read more

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GECOM must strengthen laws to stop electoral fraud

first_imgDear Editor,Electoral fraud is the illegal interference with the process of an election. It can occur at any stage of the electoral cycle, sometimes even in the pre-electoral stages, where some Governments interfere with the planning process of the elections.In a narrow election, a small amount of fraud may be enough to change the election results. Even if the outcome is not affected, the revelation of fraud can have a damaging effect if not punished, as it can reduce voters’ confidence in democracy.At a recent press conference, the General Secretary of the People’s Progressive Party, Bharrat Jagdeo, emphasised the importance of strengthening electoral laws to prevent electoral fraud from political parties and GECOM. The deterrence of such practices can be achieved through consistent and effective prosecution. Elections can help despots shore up their grip on power.Holding flawed polls can enable embattled Governments to secure access to valuable economic resources, like foreign aid, oil deals etc. While the APNU/AFC Coalition Government appear to be in their death throes, they would use the ballot box to re-establish their political dominance. That is when the facade of democracy is going to be turned into a tool of oppression to satisfy this Government.As Guyanese, we cannot allow the Government and GECOM to undermine the ideals of democracy and turn elections into empty rituals wherein the Government always win, as was evident before 1992, the PNC era of rigged elections in Guyana.As the electorate, we must insist that the APNU/AFC Government, the Opposition, and GECOM move immediately to ensure that electoral laws are being strengthened and implemented, so that persons in the electoral cycles must be held accountable for any electoral fraud in Guyana.The fiasco of Lowenfield’s disappearance recently, the Returning Officers’ disappearance, fake statements of poll etc, must never recur.Sincerely,Zamal Hussainlast_img read more

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Join Media Tenor’s Roland Schatz in Davos for a live Twitter chat on reputation management and competitiveness

first_imgOn Tuesday 20 January Brand South Africa will host a live Twitter chat on reputation management and competitiveness with Media Tenor founder and CEO Roland Schatz, live from the World Economic Forum in Davos.Managing a country’s global reputation increases its competitiveness, which attracts new investment and in turn creates jobs. (Image: Brand South Africa)Roland SchatzJoin the conversation from 17h00 CAT (16h00 CET) by sending your questions on South Africa’s reputation and global competitiveness to @Brand_SA using the hashtag #SAinDavos.The contextRoland Schatz is the CEO and founder of Media Tenor International. He is a leading scholar in the field of media impact research and global media content analysis.What is reputation management?• Reputation management is the influencing, regulating and guiding of the reputation of an individual, organisation or country. It relates to how various stakeholders in the public sphere perceive that particular individual, organisation or country.• Reputation management was originally a public relations term that has gained popularity in the 21st century with the rise of the internet and social media, where users can freely disseminate information and opinion that can negatively impact a particular business.• One of the basic principles of reputation management is decreasing or eradicating negative sentiment about a particular organisation or country, leaving mainly positive perceptions, thus attracting more business and, in the case of a country, investment.• Reputation is at the heart of a company and a country’s success. The philosophy of reputation management is to match the external perception of an organisation or state and what these external stakeholders value to the internal perception and their organisational or national values. Only when these two are harmonised can an organisation or country be truly competitive.What is competitiveness?• The World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report defines competitiveness as “the set of institutions, policies and factors that determine the level of productivity of a country. The level of productivity, in turn, sets the level of prosperity that can be reached by an economy. The productivity level also determines the rates of return obtained by investments in an economy, which in turn are the fundamental drivers of its growth rates. In other words, a more competitive economy is one that is likely to grow faster over time.”• Competitiveness therefore concerns attracting international investment and business to a particular country, as well as ensuring productivity in various sectors and industries in that that country, which will promote international trade and investment, therefore creating a healthy market economy both within that country and globally.How does reputation management relate to competitiveness?• The perception that international investors have of a particular country can either encourage them to invest in that country or deter that investment.• It is important for a country to positively portray and position itself internationally in order to attract international business, investment and trade. By doing this productivity will increase within that country, and in turn the overall economic health will improve. One of the ways economic health is measured is the rate of employment and job creation.• It is important for country to manage its international reputation, to ensure it is positively positioned internationally. It improves the country’s competitiveness, which in turn will attract investment, business and trade, which are tied to job creation.In brief• Reputation management is the influencing, regulating and guiding the reputation of an individual, organisation or country.• Reputation management deals with how people perceive a particular person, organisation or country, and thus assign a value to that perception.• The primary aim of reputation management is to decrease or even eradicate negative sentiment.• By decreasing negativity you are able to attract more business and investment.• Competitiveness concerns attracting international investment and business to a particular state, and increasing international trade.• Improved competitiveness creates a healthy market economy both within a country and globally.• A healthy national economy is linked to job creation because national productivity increases• Countries must manage their international reputation, to ensure positive positioning, to attract investment, business and trade and improve competitiveness.• Improved competitiveness is tied to job creation. Therefore, a good international reputation can create jobs.About Roland SchatzRoland Schatz is the founder and CEO of Media Tenor Ltd, the research institute of InnoVatio Verlags AG. With over 120 employees and offices in Beirut, Boston, Hanoi, London, New York, Pretoria, St Petersburg, Tianjin, Vienna and Zürich, Media Tenor is the leading provider of ongoing international media content analysis, including in-depth analysis of new and traditional global media.Schatz has a Master’s degree in philosophy, economics, history and political science from the University of Fribourg and Bonn. Aside from a background in journalism and numerous entrepreneurial ventures, Schatz has served as trustee for the Education Africa Foundation in Johannesburg, the Innovation Institute in Pretoria and the Board of E-Standards in New York. In 2008 the UN High Advisor President Sampraio appointed Schatz as Global Media Expert. Together with Prince Ghazi of Jordan he founded the C1 World Dialogue Foundation in 2009 . In 2010 Schatz launched the Global Media Impact Centre in Boston, enabling PhD students to write their thesis based on the more than 100 Mio datasets of ongoing media analysis.Schatz has taught strategic communication management and perception change at universities in Augsburg, Atlanta, Berlin, Bonn, Lugano and Prague, since 1990. He publishes regularly on reputational risk, financial sentiment and media impact, recently in the Washington Post, Harvard Business Review and Business Day. Since 2009 he has hosted together with the UN Academic Impact the Unlearning Intolerance Masterclasses.last_img read more

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Geocaching.com Presents: A Brief History of Geocaching

first_imgShare with your Friends:More [vsw id=”Mlq1KT3_sfk” source=”youtube” width=”425″ height=”344″ autoplay=”no”]Watch the Geocaching.com Presents video “A Brief History of Geocaching” to see how geocaching began.Civilian GPS devices become 10 times more accurate on May 2, 2000 – when “Selective Availability” was turned offThe history of geocaching stretches back to a single container placed in the hills of Oregon, USA. The date was May 3, 2000.  The idea was radical. Treasure hunters would be guided by signals from orbiting satellites. The first geocache was found within days. It sparked a global movement to get off the couch and get outside.The hobby has spread around the world. There are now more than 1.7 million geocaches and more than five million people call themselves geocachers. Join our ranks by exploring Geocaching.com. SharePrint RelatedGeocaching.com Presents: FavoritesOctober 20, 2011In “Learn”Geocaching.com Presents: Love StoriesFebruary 14, 2012In “Community”1,000,000 Reasons to Get Outside Now Hidden Throughout the U.S.September 15, 2014In “Community”last_img read more

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Is Episodic Content the Future of Long-Form Documentary Filmmaking?

first_imgEpisodic nonfiction has risen greatly in popularity over the last five years. Is it a simple trend or is the format here to stay?Top image via Ken BurnsLong-form episodic documentary content is not a new concept. Ken Burns has been creating this content for years and you can easily find examples of it most anywhere. However, what has changed is the way in which episodic nonfiction film is consumed. Another noteworthy change: The platforms it’s consumed on. These new-age episodic nonfiction films are now being binge-watched on Netflix and becoming items of pop culture. Creation of this long-form episodic nonfiction content is becoming widespread and the results are being consumed more aggressively and frequently. As filmmakers, this is a method of filmmaking that we need to explore more as a viable method of storytelling.Image via PBSWithin these last couple of years, we’ve seen Netflix jump on the bandwagon of episodic nonfiction with Last Chance U, Making a Murderer, Chef’s Table, and Cooked. The company has now become a leader in providing this content and has also helped facilitate its higher demand. So with the successes of Netflix and these films, does it mean that episodic content will be the future of documentary filmmaking?Who’s Noticing this Trend?Image via NetflixThis style of nonfiction content has really been gaining steam over the last couple of years. It’s been noticed to the point that independent filmmakers have now begun to receive support in this creative process. The Sundance Institute noticed this rise in episodic content and its potential for content and its creators. To support these content creators, the Institute launched the Episodic Storytelling Lab. At these labs, they help content creators develop their concepts and give year-round creative support. This is what Sundance said about the episodic format: Over the past five years, we have witnessed explosive growth of opportunities for writers developing episodic content for cable and online platforms. Audiences and critics have embraced the bold vision and complex characters that thrive in cable drama and comedy. And the internet has become a place for artists to experiment with new forms of content creation and for audiences to explore new modes of content consumption.What Are Documentary Filmmakers Saying About the Format?Image via NetflixOne of the success stories of this form of content is Last Chance U. The director, Greg Whiteley, has spoken very highly about the episodic format of documentary filmmaking. In an interview with Indiewire, the director was asked his thoughts on the episodic format and if it was something he would continually pursue. Occasionally, there will be a subject where, “That feels like 90 minutes to me,” or, “That feels like 60 minutes to me.” But, to have this as an option, and historically the high watermark for filmmaking was a feature length film, I think that’s going to change. I think the high watermark for storytelling in a cinematic way will be in this long-form way.Variety recently came out with their Oscar shortlist for documentary films. ESPN’s five-part documentary O.J.: Made in America makes the list as a potential winner.Episodic nonfiction film may be the wave of the future. As content creators, it’s a platform that we may see ourselves utilizing more in the future of our work.Do you see yourself pursuing episodic non-fiction content? Why or why not? What do you think some of the challenges may be? Let us know in the the comments below.last_img read more

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Maharashtra to help U.P. with health services

first_imgMumbai: Under fire over the deaths of children in Gorakhpur, the Uttar Pradesh (U.P.) health department has sought assistance from the Maharashtra government to implement its schemes. A delegation led by U.P. Health Minister Siddharthnath Singh on Friday met his Maharashtra counterpart, Deepak Sawant, to learn about various health schemes of the Maharashtra government and the steps being taken to minimise maternal and infant mortality. Among the schemes presented to the U.P. team were telemedicine, motorbike ambulances, blood on call, the proposed Balasaheb Thackeray accident insurance scheme and the sick newborn care unit services. The schemes are likely to be implemented in U.P. with help from the Maharashtra government. Dr. Sawant gave a detailed presentation to the delegates on a course for physicians. Mr. Singh expressed his desire that the course be started in U.P.Dr. Sawant said both States would have a common mechanism to increase the quality of health services. The U.P. government has invited a team of health officials and Dr. Sawant to visit and inspect its health facilities.“Motorbike ambulances would be an important addition to our health services to reach people through narrow lanes in Kanpur, Varanasi, Agra and Meerut. We have fewer government doctors in specialised fields. Maharashtra’s telemedicine model could be implemented in our State, which will be helpful,” said Mr. Singh.last_img read more

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Philippines, Myanmar set semis target for football

first_imgMyla Pablo earns PVL MVP SEPANG—The Philippines and Myanmar Under-23 football teams have arrived with similar targets – to reach the semi-finals of the KL SEA Games.Myanmar head coach Gerd Zeise believes his team can achieve the target based on their silver-medal finish at Singapore 2015, when they lost 3-0 to Thailand in the final.ADVERTISEMENT The Philippines head coach, Marlon Maro, boldly predicted that Malaysia would win the gold medal.Thailand are the favourites to retain the gold after winning the last two editions but Maro, 52, feels that Malaysia could nick it based on the improvement shown by Datuk Ong Kim Swee’s charges.“Thailand are a good team, but I pick Malaysia as favourites for the gold medal. If you look back at history, Malaysia have a good record as hosts, having reached won gold in 1989 and silver in 2001,” said Maro.He also said that his players were better prepared this time compared to Singapore 2015 as “we have played a series of friendlies in Japan and Cambodia”.“We all know that we have two strong teams in our group – Thailand and Vietnam. So, we will take it one game at a time.ADVERTISEMENT Read Nextcenter_img “We must first clear the preliminary hurdles before thinking about the semi-finals. I’m confident my boys will be ready for the challenge,” Zeise told reporters after the team’s arrival at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) here Saturday.The 64-year-old German, however, warned his men not to underestimate the other teams in Group A, including hosts Malaysia, Singapore, Laos and Brunei.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“Malaysia are certainly the favourites to reach the semi-finals as hosts,” said Zeise, who was previously in charge of Myanmar’s senior team.Myanmar will kick off their campaign against Singapore at the Selayang Municipal Council Stadium on Monday. “Our main objective is to reach the semi-finals,” said Maro.The Philippines, who failed to advance to the knockout stage in 2015, are in Group B with Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam and Timor Leste.They will open their campaign against Cambodia at the Selayang Municipal Council Stadium on Aug 15.last_img read more

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Ohio State gymnast Jake Martin following in line of successful Buckeyes

Junior all-around gymnast Jake Martin has claimed multiple accolades during his time as a Buckeye.Credit: Courtesy of OSU AthleticsBig Ten athletics are, more often than not, associated with football or men’s basketball.But that’s not what comes to mind for Jake Martin.When Martin thinks of the Big Ten, the first things that come to his mind are: Ohio State, gymnastics at Michigan and gymnastics at Illinois, the OSU all-around gymnast said.“I think gymnastics in general is underrated,” he said.Martin, a junior from Oviedo, Fla., has been a three-time U.S. Junior National Team member, and claimed fifth in the all-around at the 2014 NCAA Championships, along with picking up multiple Gymnast of the Week titles.When Martin was growing up and was asked where he wanted to attend college, he would mention OSU, and typically hear about the quality of its football team, he said. But he’d instead respond with names of top gymnasts that competed for the Buckeyes.“Blaine Wilson went here, Raj Bhavsar went there, the Hamm twins,” Martin said. “I know a lot of these things about the school that a lot of people wouldn’t know.”Wilson is a gymnast who won the Nissen-Emery Award in 1997, which is men’s gymnastics’ equivalent of the Heisman Trophy. He is also a silver medal recipient from the 2004 Athens Olympics. Bhavsar won the bronze medal in the 2008 summer Olympics and twins Paul and Morgan Hamm are American gymnasts who helped the U.S. win multiple medals in the 2000 and 2004 Olympics.Gymnastics was Martin’s biggest factor when it came down to attending college, he said. The freezing cold temperatures of Ohio are certainly not what he’s used to from growing up in central Florida, but it was a reasonable trade-off because of OSU’s impressive gymnastics program.Now with the Buckeyes, Martin has at least one teammate who thinks he’s at the top of the sport.“(Martin) is one of the best gymnasts in the United States in my opinion,” sophomore all-around Sean Melton said.While he might be one of the best by his teammate’s standards, there were some who told Martin to take his talents to a different sport when he was younger.Growing up tall, gymnastics wasn’t the first sport that came to people’s minds for Martin.“A lot of people told me going into high school, ‘You should probably think about doing other sports to get a scholarship,’” he said. “I did get some kind of grief from people.”Martin said people sometimes told him “gymnastics is a girl’s sport”, but he just laughed it off.“I didn’t do gymnastics for anyone,” he said. “I did it for me. So I just thought to myself, ‘If it’s a girl’s sport, I’m just going to enjoy it.’”Along with honing his craft as a gymnast, Martin said he has high aspirations in the classroom as well.As a junior international studies major, he’s preparing to take the LSAT in June and is preparing as much as he can to attend law school. Martin said the athletic department and school itself have been helpful during his times of frantic scheduling.Growing up, Martin appreciated the support he got from his family and friends. Now in college, the two-time All-American has noticed that the atmosphere OSU has sets it apart from the rest.“You have people in the crowd that you don’t know,” Martin said. “But they’re wearing scarlet and gray so you know they’re cheering for you and you know they’ve got your back.”Melton said Martin brings more to the team than anyone could ever ask for.“I think he’s a great leader,” Melton said. “To have him on my team is definitely something we’re happy about and I can’t speak more highly of him.”Martin discovered his interest in gymnastics when he was a child with a growing curiosity. His cousins taught him how to do a back handspring off of an old mattress, which he mimicked off of his couch, resulting in a sprained thumb.Shortly after, he was signed up for gymnastics class and within a year, he was signed up for a pre-team because of his impressive progression.“Once I started gymnastics, that was it … I just decided that this is exactly what I want to do,” he said.Martin considers gymnastics a sport in which one must always work at perfecting their skill.“The main goal (in a lot of other sports) is to score,” Martin said.For gymnastics, however, he said displaying one’s perfectly crafted skills is the main goal.“We’re using our bodies differently,” he said. “When people think of brute strength, they think of weightlifting. But when you look at still rings, you have to hold these positions and it’s the same thing except our toes are pointed.“Gymnastics brings this element of brute strength, but we have to make it look good.”While the 2016 Olympics aren’t for some time, Martin said he uses every practice and competition to hone his skills into becoming a better athlete and an Olympic hopeful.“It’s nerve-wracking and I try not to think about what’s going to happen a little over a year from now,” he said. “But it is coming up and I have been thinking about it.” read more

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Pedaling for Pattie is raising money for Rady Childrens Hospital

first_img Posted: September 6, 2019 September 6, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, Pedaling for Pattie is raising money for Rady Children’s Hospital KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A San Diego Man is riding his “Beach Cruiser” from the Golden Gate Bridge to Ocean Beach to raise money for Rady Children’s Hospital and childhood cancer.Ryan Gehris’ mother died of cancer, in his arms. Now, he’s on a mission to give back. Categories: California News, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more