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All Aboard the Scripting Train: Moving from DTK to RACADM

first_imgFor those PowerEdge server customers who use scripts to manage servers, you’re probably familiar with a longtime Dell EMC tool: the Dell Deployment Toolkit (DTK). What you may not know is that DTK’s days are numbered, and there’s a newer command-line tool that will do the job for many years to come: the Remote Access Controller Admin (RACADM) utility.As part of our commitment to intelligent automation, we want to make sure our customers can manage servers in the manner that best suits their IT environment, and for many customers, using scripts is their method of choice. RACADM provides a reliable means to do just that. So, to support this transition, we have prepared two new documents for you.What was DTK for?But first, a little background. The DTK is a set of utilities, scripts, and configuration files used to configure PowerEdge servers in both Windows and Linux environments. DTK will be sustained for current (that’s 14th generation PowerEdge servers like the R740, as an example) and earlier supported platforms until those platforms pass their end of support life (EOSL) threshold. Dell EMC will not offer support for DTK on future platforms.We strongly recommend that if you are using DTK now, that you start learning about using the RADADM utility.What can RACADM do?RACADM is a command line tool that allows for remote or local management of Dell EMC servers via the integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) that is embedded in every PowerEdge server. RACADM provides functionality similar to that provided by the iDRAC’s web interface. Another plus for RACADM users is that the Dell Chassis Management Controller (CMC), the embedded management device for blade server chassis, can also be managed remotely. RACADM commands can be run remotely from a management station and/or locally on the managed system. RACADM commands allow operations such as viewing system information, performing power operations, firmware updates, and configuring settings. Since RACADM is run from a command line interface (CLI), system administrators can create scripts that control and update Dell multiple systems at the same time.To support your move to RACADM, Dell EMC engineers have written two new documents for existing DTK users to help guide them to and through a smooth transition to RACADM. The first is a guide that can be used as a reference manual for using DTK with supported PowerEdge servers and provides transition guidelines for RACADM deployment and configuration in Windows and Linux environments. The second is intended to be used as a reference manual to map RAIDCFG (a DTK utility used for storage configuration) operations into equivalent RACADM command syntax for PowerEdge Raid Controllers (PERC). These RAIDCFG operations are supported in the PowerEdge server platforms through the current 14th generation systems.I hope you find this interesting and useful. With RACADM, you’ll be managing your PowerEdge servers just the way you want to. For more information, please take a look at these additional resources:DTK Transition Guide: http://dell.to/2GE0sOmDTK RAIDCFG to RACADM Whitepaper: http://dell.to/2CBO8eYiDRAC with LC TechCenter page: http://dell.to/2BHniFgRACADM TechCenter page:  http://dell.to/1jXAbz9iDRAC TechCenter page- http://delltechcenter.com/idracDTK TechCenter page: http://dell.to/2hzENvGTo stay in the loop on future updates and product releases, join the conversation on Twitter at @DellEMCServers.last_img read more

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Woman sells Bernie doll for over $20K, donates to charity

first_imgCORPUS CHRISTI, Texas (AP) — Bernie Sanders went from becoming a hit meme to a nearly $20,000-crochet doll in less than a week. After the Vermont senator went viral on social media for his simple Inauguration Day fashion choices of quirky brown mittens and over-sized olive-green coat, Tobey King in Texas got to crocheting. She turned the sensational image that trended for days on social media into a 9-inch crochet doll. It sold for $20,300 on an eBay auction. The 46-year-old King said she will donate to Meals on Wheels America. Her donation was inspired by Sanders, whose campaign created sweatshirts with the image on them and donated the proceeds to Meals on Wheel in Vermont.last_img read more

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Graduates compete in job market, enter work force

first_imgAs their collegiate careers wind down, members of the Class of 2012 have set sights on their professional futures. A majority will enter the work force with the strength of a Notre Dame degree backing them up, as statistics show University graduates fare well in job placement.  Kevin Monahan, associate director at the Career Center, said he expects this year’s placement statistics to compare well to last year’s strong numbers. “For the class of 2011 last year, 85 percent left Notre Dame with definite plans: military careers, graduate school, post-graduate service or full-time employment,” he said. “Within three months of graduation, that number was in the upper 90s [percent.]” A Notre Dame degree carries great value, according to Monahan, who cited positive feedback from recruiters at Epic, a medical technology company located in Madison, Wisc., which recruited 36 graduating seniors this year. Monahan said the nature of certain sectors of the job market where positions become available and are filled rapidly leads to fluctuations in employment opportunities.  “It really depends on the industry,” he said. “Certain industries hire on the ‘just-in-time’ market, like advertising, film, television and communications – they hire when they have need.” While some companies recruit well in advance of graduation, opportunities with those who use this type of hiring schedule are more difficult to anticipate. “If an advertising agency has an opening, they interview you today and ask you to start next week,” he said. Monahan said alumni networking is important in the job hunt, stressing these connections can lead to unexpected opportunities. “Because of the tight time frames, networking is very important,” he said. “You want people to be able to alert you to potential job openings.” The Notre Dame alumni network is especially helpful with “just-in-time” hiring industries, he said. Monahan cited the Chicago-based advertising agency Abelson Taylor as an example. “They have hired about 10 Notre Dame alumni in the past year, and each one has been through networking and referrals,” he said. “They rarely post any openings on their website, because [recruiting is] all done by alumni recommending other alumni.” Regardless of how graduates find job opportunities, Monahan said he is confident members of the class of 2012 will succeed in finding employment. “It’s still a challenging job market for graduating seniors,” Monahan said. “But with the resources available to our students through employer relationships, Career Center counseling and alumni networking, we are confident that all of graduates will be successful in their chosen careers.” Monahan said the Career Center continues to offer its services to seniors after graduation. “We will continue to work with students and young alumni in their job search,” he said. “I want to encourage the graduates, that, if they’re still seeking employment, please reach out to the Career Center. We’d love to help each person build a game plan for their job search.”last_img read more

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HHS announces final rules, delay in implementation of contraceptive mandate

first_imgThe Obama administration announced on Tuesday a one-year delay in implementing the final rules regarding the Affordable Care Act’s mandated contraceptive coverage. The White House released the final rules Friday, in response to concerns raised by non-profit religious organizations about the original healthcare proposal. The mandate will take effect in 2015. The final rule states that an organization that objects to providing contraceptives on religious grounds can offer employees a plan that does not provide contraceptive coverage. The health insurer administering the plan then enrolls employees in a separate, individual, private policy that only covers contraceptives at no extra cost. Notre Dame is self-insured. A self-insured organization that objects to providing contraceptives can notify its third-party healthcare administrator that it objects. The administrator then “notifies enrollees in the health plans that it is providing or arranging separate no-cost payments for contraceptive services for them for as long as they remain enrolled in the health plan,” according to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) website. University Spokesman Dennis Brown said, “We are studying the ruling and, once that’s complete, will evaluate our options.” HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said on the department’s website that the final rules guarantee women free access to preventive services recommended by the Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academies of Science. “[The] announcement reinforces our commitment to respect the concerns of houses of worship and other non-profit religious organizations that object to contraceptive coverage, while helping to ensure that women get the care they need, regardless of where they work,” Sebelius said. Law professor Rick Garnett, an expert on religious liberty cases, said litigation against the mandate likely will continue. He said some non-exempt religious organizations will argue that the final rules, like the original ones, impose a substantial and unnecessary burden on the free exercise of religion. “In response, it will be contended that it is these groups’ insurance carriers, and not the groups themselves, that are providing the objectionable coverage,” Garnett said. “It is likely that different courts will resolve the issue in different ways, which raises the possibility that eventually, the Supreme Court will be asked to weigh in.” In May 2012, Notre Dame filed one of more than 40 religious liberty lawsuits from faith-based organizations contesting the constitutionality of the contraception mandate. The lawsuit stated the mandate would go against Church teachings and therefore would violate the First Amendment, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and other federal laws. A federal judge dismissed Notre Dame’s lawsuit in early January, when U.S. District Court Judge Robert Miller Jr. ruled the University’s claim was not yet “ripe,” meaning it was not ready to be litigated. This was the case because the rule regarding contraceptive coverage had not been finalized.  The University declined to provide public comment on the iteration of the mandate that the Obama administration proposed in February.,The Obama administration announced on Tuesday a one-year delay in implementing the final rules regarding the Affordable Care Act’s mandated contraceptive coverage. The White House released the final rules Friday, in response to concerns raised by non-profit religious organizations about the original healthcare proposal. The mandate will take effect in 2015. The final rule states that an organization that objects to providing contraceptives on religious grounds can offer employees a plan that does not provide contraceptive coverage. The health insurer administering the plan then enrolls employees in a separate, individual, private policy that only covers contraceptives at no extra cost. Notre Dame is self-insured. A self-insured organization that objects to providing contraceptives can notify its third-party healthcare administrator that it objects. The administrator then “notifies enrollees in the health plans that it is providing or arranging separate no-cost payments for contraceptive services for them for as long as they remain enrolled in the health plan,” according to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) website. University Spokesman Dennis Brown said, “We are studying the ruling and, once that’s complete, will evaluate our options.” HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said on the department’s website that the final rules guarantee women free access to preventive services recommended by the Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academies of Science. “[The] announcement reinforces our commitment to respect the concerns of houses of worship and other non-profit religious organizations that object to contraceptive coverage, while helping to ensure that women get the care they need, regardless of where they work,” Sebelius said. Law professor Rick Garnett, an expert on religious liberty cases, said litigation against the mandate likely will continue. He said some non-exempt religious organizations will argue that the final rules, like the original ones, impose a substantial and unnecessary burden on the free exercise of religion. “In response, it will be contended that it is these groups’ insurance carriers, and not the groups themselves, that are providing the objectionable coverage,” Garnett said. “It is likely that different courts will resolve the issue in different ways, which raises the possibility that eventually, the Supreme Court will be asked to weigh in.” In May 2012, Notre Dame filed one of more than 40 religious liberty lawsuits from faith-based organizations contesting the constitutionality of the contraception mandate. The lawsuit stated the mandate would go against Church teachings and therefore would violate the First Amendment, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and other federal laws. A federal judge dismissed Notre Dame’s lawsuit in early January, when U.S. District Court Judge Robert Miller Jr. ruled the University’s claim was not yet “ripe,” meaning it was not ready to be litigated. This was the case because the rule regarding contraceptive coverage had not been finalized.  The University declined to provide public comment on the iteration of the mandate that the Obama administration proposed in February.last_img read more

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Notre Dame seniors to volunteer, enter workforce

first_imgSenior Jessica Zic stumbled upon her post-graduation plans one day in an email she received from the Center for Social Concerns. Zic, a neuroscience and behavior major with a supplemental major in Latino studies, said she knew she wanted to try something new after graduating but was unsure exactly what that entailed.Susan Zhu | The Observer “I knew I wanted to do something different after school because I’d been a student my whole life,” Zic said. “I wanted to see the world from a different angle before I started medical school and went back to the classroom.”After graduation, Zic will be volunteering at Casa de Esperanza de los Niños in Houston, Texas. Casa de Esperanza is a non-profit organization that helps kids who are in crisis due to abuse or neglect. According to Zic, she will be a part of the residential program and live in a house with interns and children under six years old.“It just seemed like a really great place where I could do a lot for a very vulnerable population and grow as a person there before continuing on with my plans as a doctor,” Zic said.Zic said she is currently in the midst of applying for medical school for the fall of 2017. She said her major and supplemental major had a lot to do with her decision to work at Casa de Esperanza.“Working with children that young, there’s so much going on in terms of brain development and health,” she said. “If you’re able to provide really good care for children that age, the impact will last their whole lives.”According to the First Destination Data for the class of 2015 on the Career Center’s website, seven percent of students went on to participate in a service program after graduation, 62 percent of graduates entered full employment, 26 percent went onto graduate or professional school and two percent entered the military. Two percent still sought employment, while another two percent had other plans, the data said.Zic said she believes Notre Dame places a huge role on the importance of service and her involvement with the Center for Social Concerns was vital in her decision to pursue service post-graduation.“All of those service experiences … I really learned a lot from them and having an opportunity to serve for a whole year was something that was really special to me, just because of what I got through the previous experiences,” Zic said. “I’ll be able to form strong relationships and really get to know the people that I work with and the children I’ll be serving.”Senior and finance major Kimberly Sammons will be working in Phoenix, Ariz. as an analyst for Amazon in their Operations Finance Rotational Program, she said.“It’s a rotational program so it’s three six-month rotations,” Sammons said. “I didn’t know where I wanted to live permanently, but I figured this would be a good opportunity to get involved with a great international company and experience more areas of the country than I had before.”Sammons said she will be working on the financial analytics of the company, evaluating performance and figuring out how to reduce company costs without compromising quality.“I think it will be really fast paced and you don’t get that a lot in corporate finance, so it will be a really great learning experience,” Sammons said. “People have told me it’s tough, but you grow and become more comfortable in your skills and abilities.”Sammons said the ethics of business that she learned during her time at Notre Dame are just as important as her background knowledge in finance and learned communication skills.“Notre Dame teaches you how to be a good business person ethically and how to succeed without having to sacrifice any of your morals and values,” Sammons said.Senior computer science major Kendra Bilardello said she will be a software engineer in St. Louis, Mo. for The Boeing Company at their Virtual Warfare Center.“It was appealing to me because I really liked the defense aspect of computer science and helping in a way that’s more related to defending the country,” Bilardello said. “A lot of it is getting input from other people and figure out where Boeing should put money into in the future and what sort of things pilots want to see … 10 years down the road.”She said her classes at Notre Dame prepared her for the job, due to the fact her classes used the same software language as Boeing. Bilardello said Boeing is a great opportunity because of the 2,000 software engineers in St. Louis and the availability of different projects for engineers.Rising seniors should remain optimistic about their job search, Bilardello said.“Don’t worry if you don’t get something before fall break,” she said. “People are still looking second semester so don’t panic — Notre Dame is very good about prepping people for jobs. There is something out there.”Tags: Commencement 2016, employment, jobs, ND employmentlast_img read more

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Students look forward to attending College GameDay taping before taking on Miami

first_imgESPN’s “College GameDay” will be in Coral Gables, Florida, for No. 3 Notre Dame’s game against No. 7 Miami on Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon.Senior David Hessert, who will be attending the game, said College GameDay is known to cover games featuring teams with “storied rivalries, where there are implications for both teams’ success.” Rosie LoVoi | The Observer Senior and Notre Dame leprechaun Joe Fennessy entertains the crowd during Notre Dame’s 48-37 victory over Wake Forest.Hessert said he believes the broadcast is sure to draw national attention for the game.“College GameDay tends to heighten the anticipation around the game and creates a really fun atmosphere for fans,” he said.Hessert said he had attended a game covered by College GameDay once before — the Notre Dame-South Carolina game in 2005.The atmosphere of the game “was absolutely electric,” Hessert said.“You could just feel the excitement in the air,” he said.Senior Morgan Dunn, who is also attending the game, said she is particularly excited for Saturday because of the historic rivalry between Notre Dame and Miami. The rivalry stems largely from a 1988 game in which Notre Dame defeated Miami 31-30, Dunn said.As for game day predictions, Dunn said she believes the Irish will win by two touchdowns.“Their defense is pretty good,” Dunn said. “But our offense will overtake them.”Despite the fact that Miami remains undefeated this season, Hessert said he also predicts a Notre Dame victory.“[Miami] really hasn’t had a formidable opponent yet,” Hessert said. “Notre Dame will be their true test.”The outcome of the game is likely to depend on Notre Dame’s rushing offense, Hessert said.“If our offensive line can make a bit of a push, we should be able to win,” he said.Senior Joe Fennessy, who serves as the Notre Dame Leprechaun for football games, will also be in Florida for the game this weekend.As the Leprechaun, Fennessy said his main job will be rallying support for the Irish and interacting with fans before and during the game.After making an appearance at a pep rally hosted by the Notre Dame Club of Miami on Friday night, Fennessy said he will arrive on set for the College GameDay broadcast by 8 a.m. on Saturday.Fennessy said he expects Saturday’s program to cover “anything from short segments on players and coaches to in-depth reviews of different teams.”Fennessy said he is particularly excited for the prediction segment at the end of the broadcast. Lee Corso, one of the show’s four hosts, concludes each program by donning the mascot headgear of the team he predicts to win, Fennessy said.Fennessy said he hopes for a vote for Notre Dame, and is confident in the team’s ability to return to South Bend with a victory.“Of course I think the Irish are going to win,” Fennessy said. “They’ve been working hard. The team’s getting better every week.”Tags: college gameday, football, Football Friday Featurelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s senior opens skincare company

first_imgSaint Mary’s senior Julia Veome has recently started her own business: Natural Baller, an organic skincare company that encourages customers to “Live life with no filter.”Veome, a business administration major with a concentration in marketing and a minor in public relations and advertising, said she had always wanted to open her own company, but only decided to do so at the end of her junior year.“I kind of just jumped into it,” Veome said.  “I didn’t think I would ever be able to do something like this as young as I am.”After extensively researching the detrimental impact of social media on female self-esteem, Veome said she decided to use her business background to help young women feel comfortable in their own skin. In her own experience, Veome said she always felt that clear, healthy skin allowed her to go makeup-free.“I don’t think makeup or filters are going anywhere, so I’m not trying to get rid of them or even say that they’re bad. I just want followers and customers of Natural Baller to feel like they are confident in themselves before all that,” she said. “I felt like it was important to have a clean skincare brand that also emphasized the importance of taking care of your skin and embracing your natural look.”The name Natural Baller stems from the natural, organic ingredients incorporated into the brand’s skincare products, but Veome said it also acknowledges her wish that customers feel confident with their natural selves. “Baller” is a term Veome said originated in her family group chat and has come to mean feeling encouraged and empowered.“I think that it’s important for girls to look at themselves that way, like, ‘Yeah, I am a baller and I just crushed that,’” she said.Veome said her pursuit of the Natural Baller mission has helped her start to see other women in a different light, and come to the realization that everyone can find their inner “baller” with the right attitude. She said her younger sister Samantha, a high school senior who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, earned the title after she started making bracelets with her diabetes tag attached for her friends.“She’s always been super positive and wanted to help other girls [with diabetes],” Veome said. “Now I look at her and I think, ‘Samantha is such a baller.’”In order to make Natural Baller a reality, Veome deepened her research into the chemistry of skincare and worked with multiple laboratories to formulate her products. Faced with the prospect of spending years developing products from scratch, Veome said she decided to partner with a company in Florida offering a base formula that she could adapt to her liking.In addition to designing the products themselves, Veome also started to make a social media presence for herself, creating a website, as well as Instagram and Facebook accounts. She said navigating the intricacies of starting a small business was a learning curve.“I started working with a graphic designer to make the labels but didn’t like what I was getting, so I actually designed the labels myself. I registered as an LLC in Illinois and also trademarked the brand and the slogan,” Veome said. “I thought it would be a lot of work, but it was way more work that I even thought. I feel like with everything I’ve done, I’ve learned of 10 more things I need to do without knowing they existed before.”“It definitely has been super busy, but it also has been super fun because [Natural Baller] is something that I’ve worked really hard at and am really passionate about. I’ve been creating a buzz around campus and girls have been super supportive and excited about it,” Veome said.Veome also said she didn’t know if Natural Baller would have found success at any school other than Saint Mary’s, where the entire community has surrounded her with energy and encouragement. Veome has received an additional outpouring of support from her family members running the business side of Natural Baller from the basement of Veome’s home in LaGrange, Illinois.While Veome said she has found it easy to raise awareness at Saint Mary’s, it has been difficult to take Natural Baller beyond the college.  In an effort to expand her brand, Veome said she plans to partner with Teleties, an athleisure accessory company specializing in long-lasting, waterproof hair ties.“I sent them my products hoping that something good would come out of it, and they responded saying how much they loved them and that they were going to use them in their next photo shoot,” Veome said.Veome said the growth on social media will take Natural Baller closer to her goal of reaching as many young women as possible and helping them feel beautiful while also encouraging them to support and empower others. She also said she hopes that her company allows her customers to live confidently and unfiltered on social media.“I think [Natural Baller] is mostly about not comparing yourself to other women. A lot of women see another woman succeeding in something and they allow that to make them feel bad about themselves,” Veome said.  “I would love to have girls posting photos of themselves without makeup doing something they love and giving it the hashtag ‘natural baller.’”Tags: company, Natural Baller, skincarelast_img read more

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SMC looks to celebrate 175 un-belle-ievable years

first_imgIn 1844, four Holy Cross sisters, at the request of Fr. Basil Moreau, braved a 40-day voyage from Le Mans, France to Bertrand, Michigan, where they established the first Saint Mary’s school and novitiate. 175 years later, the school has moved a little south and grown extensively in size, but still upholds those four sisters’ core values.This year, the year of 2019, marks the 175th anniversary of Saint Mary’s College. To commemorate this anniversary milestone, the College has planned several events to honor Saint Mary’s’ rich history of community service, education, justice, faith and spirituality. This celebration will last a full calendar year, with a closing celebration on Dec. 8. The anniversary celebration will kick off Jan. 20, the official day of the Blessed Feast of Fr. Basil Moreau — the founder of the sisters, brothers and priests of the Holy Cross. Vice president of mission Judy Fean said having the celebration kick off on Jan. 20 is truly a great way to honor the legacy of Fr. Moreau, the sisters, brothers and priests.“We are celebrating their openness to educating hearts and minds,” she said. “This day couldn’t have come at a better time at the beginning of a new semester and beginning of a new year.” Michelle Egan, associate director at the Center for Spirituality, said the celebration also comes on the cusp of celebrating another great leader: Martin Luther King Jr.“The anniversary kicks off during MLK week,” she said. “Martin Luther King Jr. was a person who made a difference and responded to the needs of building a just world.”Jan. 20 will begin with Saint Mary’s Serves, Egan said, an event that will allow the Saint Mary’s community to serve different agencies in the South Bend community through helping out with eight different service projects. “We’ll have eight projects that will assist agencies in our local community, agencies that the College and the sisters have been helping with for a long time,” she said. “That’s from 12:45-3:00 [p.m.] and we purposely made it 1 hour and 75 minutes long. Students will have the opportunity to cut fleece blankets or put together hygiene kits and gratitude baggies.”Shay Jolly, director of retention and first year experience, said the celebratory Mass will follow the service event, and take place on campus at the Church of Loretto. “The sisters and the college community — students, alumni, faculty, staff — will all come together to celebrate the liturgy for the day and really kick us off in the spiritual light of the 175th,” she said. Fean said the Mass is also the opening liturgy of the year and as a symbolic way of coming together, the Loretto Choir, the Women’s Choir and the Liturgical Choir will all join voices. At 5 p.m., the community is invited to the annual Fr. Moreau dinner, where traditional French cuisine will be served in honor of the Holy Cross foundation in France. Jolly said the dinner will also feature a surprise special guest.Shari Rodriguez, vice president of college relations, said many other events in honor of the anniversary will occur throughout the year. She said the College intends to celebrate the legacy of the School of Sacred Theology and the alums of that institution. As well, Rodriguez said the Women’s Choir has also been invited to perform in New York City at Carnegie Hall on March 17, so Belles are encouraged to register for the trip online where they will get to see the performance and connect with College alumnae who live in the city.In June, the Saint Mary’s Alumnae Association, one of the oldest Catholic women’s associations, will celebrate its 140th anniversary. Students and student-led organizations on campus are also invited to submit their own ideas for events. Students may reach out to the co-chairs of the celebration, Fean and Rodriguez, with their ideas.  Fean, who was a part of the College’s 150th anniversary celebration, said this anniversary allows students to celebrate their moment and their current experience as a Belle, while still encouraging reverence for the past and hope for the future. “We’re celebrating the moment while you’re here,” she said. “This celebration helps us to remember the past, see how far we’ve come, honor where we’ve been. It’s looking back to celebrate the present — to step with trust and faith into the future.”Everyone has a different reason for their pride when reflecting on 175 years of Saint Mary’s. Fean said 175 years of education alone is a feat — and one that should be celebrated. “This education, this academic excellence, could have only continued for 175 years because of the immense courage of the Holy Cross sisters,” Rodriguez said. “Those early sisters, and sisters from later on, stayed against all odds because they were committed to God and their mission of education,” she said. But the legacy of the College would not be as fruitful without the stories and legacies each Belle leaves after she leaves, Jolly said. “It’s 175 years of women and alumnae who have wrote their Saint Mary’s story, you [students] are developing your story now, but I know each of us alumnae, and also staff who have worked with us, has a Saint Mary’s story that continues as they move on into their next stage on life,” she said.All in all, Egan said the 175th anniversary allows the community to both reflect on the past and look towards the future. “It’s an opportunity to look back on the things that have happened and rekindle our interest in the history of the College, but also to look towards the future and where we can go from here,” she said.  This 175th anniversary will not only celebrate the institution but all those who have left and are looking to leave a legacy at Saint Mary’s, Jolly said. “One-hundred-seventy-five years is a huge feat for any institution, especially for a small liberal arts college in Nowhere, Indiana,” she said. “There’s something to be said for the fact that we’ve been here for 175 years and we’re still going strong into the future. The opportunity to celebrate that and celebrate it as a community is really important.” Tags: 175 years of SMC, 175th anniversary, Sisters of Holy Crosslast_img read more

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Heralded author to speak at Notre Dame

first_imgAward-winning author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie will speak at Notre Dame on March 19, the University announced in a Wednesday press release. The event is part of the Sr. Kathleen Cannon, O.P. Distinguished Lecture Series.Adichie is the recipient of a 2008 MacArthur “Genius Grant,” the release said. She is known for her novels “Half of a Yellow Sun” and “Purple Hibiscus,” as well as the essay “We Should All Be Feminists,” which was adapted from her 2012 TED Talk of the same title. Her books have won awards including the Orange Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award.“We are grateful to bring such a renowned, accomplished author to speak to the Notre Dame community,” associate professor of theology Fr. Paulinus Odozor said in the release. “Ms. Adichie uses her work and platform to advocate for the best in humanity, and we look forward to learning from her experience when she lectures on campus.”The lecture will be held at 7:30 p.m. in Leighton Concert Hall in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Adichie’s talk is free but ticketed.Tags: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, debartolo performing arts center, Kathleen Cannon O.P. Distinguished Lecture, We Should All Be Feministslast_img read more